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dispensers, as students lined the beauti- ful, simple benches to watch returns coming in on large TVs tuned to Fox, CNN, and MSNBC. Government profes- sor Ron Seyb opened with a talk about what to look for in the swing states. He


“FOR ONCE, I FEEL LIKE I HAVE A VOICE AND I AM CONTRIBUTING TO SOCIETY BY VOTING FOR WHO I BELIEVE WILL POSITIVELY IMPACT OUR COUNTRY.”


also encouraged students to tweet their thoughts and predic- tions on Twitter’s #skidelection2012. (“Just a mix of old school fun and new technology,” tweeted one.)


“My job was to help students look at the returns in a more informed way, to know what states were being con- tested and how they were being contested,” says Seyb. In the process he hoped to give them a better understanding of the elec- toral college, “because I think that’s still fairly elu- sive to a lot of students, and understandably so.” Noting that “spaces make a difference in how we as- similate and think about things,” Seyb was pleased to see the event held inside an exhibition devoted to American politics. “You don’t see that very often,” he says. “It’s a less sterile environment; it shakes things up a bit to be able to look around and say, ‘This is about politics.’”


entries such as “An amendment to de- fine ‘person’ as a living breathing non- corporate organic fully human entity.” Among the fully human entities tak- ing part in the exhibition so far, perhaps none have been more enthusiastic than


CARDBOARD CANDIDATES JOIN A GROUP PHOTO ON ELECTION NIGHT.


Spring semester events (see tang.skidmore.edu) feature two faculty discus- sions about the state of civil society, hosted by so- ciologist John Bruegge- mann in February. Breslin’s constitutional crowdsourcing is up in March. And Seligman has lined up a guest lecture by Jeffrey Clements, whose book Corporations Are Not People proposes a 28th Amendment that would overturn the Supreme Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision and specify that Constitutional rights exist in people but not corporations. In fact, that senti- ment was given ample attention in the exhibit’s wish list, with


FIRST-TIMERS FILL OUT FORMS AT THE VOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE.


those availing themselves of a new-voter registration drive cosponsored by the Saratoga County League of Women Voters. Eighteen-year-old Randy Cuevas ’16, a freshman from New York City, found the process easy and rewarding: “For once, I feel like I have a voice and I am contributing to society by voting for who I believe will positively impact our country in all aspects possible.” Like many stu- dents, he registered to vote in his college home- town of Saratoga Springs. Rebecca Schwartz ’14 was a volunteer at the drive. “I wanted to make sure my peers had the opportunity to register to vote,” she says. “A lot of students just turned 18 or 19 and hadn’t yet reg- istered, and this election was so important.” She shared the excitement of the 150 first-timers who signed up, and she adds, “It was awesome being inside an art exhibit that was based around the Constitution.” That’s the kind of one- on-one citizen-with-Con- stitution encounter that Breslin hoped to inspire.


And while tweeting and crowdsourcing—against the back drop of a giant “We the People” written in shoelaces—may not seem like your forefathers’ political process, one has to suspect that America’s founders would be gratified if they could see what’s afoot in the Tang today.


SOCIAL-CLASS ISSUES AT SKIDMORE?


A MAJOR TANG MUSEUM SHOW for 2013–14 will be Classless Society, exploring social and economic perspectives on class in America through contemporary art as well as historical and cultural objects. The curators (Professors Janet Casey and Meh met Odekon, with the Tang’s Rachel Seligman ’91 and guest


curator John Weber) are eager to include the voices of Skid- more students past and present. Alumni are encouraged to send anecdotes or memories about class alliances or divisions at Skidmore, town-gown relations affected by class status, or other class-related experiences to ClassStories@skidmore.edu.


14 SCOPE WINTER 2013


QUERY:


ANDRZEJ PILARCZYK


GARY GOLD


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