This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PAGE 2 SEPTEMBER 2012


Inside Your Co-op is published monthly for 


Board of Trustees PRESIDENT


 VICE PRESIDENT


 SECRETARY TREASURER


 


 


 





Management and Staff  Terry Matlock


 


 Jia Johnson


 Tonia Allred


  


 Jim Malone


 


toll free telephone 800-780-6486


web site www.choctawelectric.coop


 PLEASE CALL


800-780-6486 


Can you find the lucky light bulb? www.choctawelectric.coop, 


Choctaw Electric’s lucky light bulb is hidden on the Choctaw Electric Cooperative website. Find it and you could win $25! Search for the icon at www.choctawelectric.coop. If you spot the lucky lightbulb, please email LoisAnn Beason at lbeason@choctawelectric.coop.


BY TERRY MATLOCK Chief Executive Officer


Changing times, changing prices


Some of you may remember coal oil lamps and open windows or sleeping out on the porch to catch a breeze. No electricity meant no lights, no air conditioning and none of the comforts we enjoy today.


R


Then, with some skepticism, the roll out of electricity to the rural area began. Those fortunate enough to get electricity got a light bulb for the living area and maybe a barn light and a yard light. The early days also


emember when you used dimes, nickels and pennies to pay for things? Times have certainly changed.


meant a “light bill.”


Today the light bill has become so much more. If you inventory your house you most likely will find two or three ceiling fans with multiple bulbs, hair dryers, curling irons, flat irons, two or three televisions sets plus MP-3 players, a satellite receiver, cell phone charger, iPad, computer, Wii or Xbox—oh yes—and the microwave, central heat and air, or window unit air conditioner, washer, dryer, stove, refrigerator, freezer, extra refrigerator and freezer, dishwasher, cordless phone charger, night lights, yard lights, and who knows what else.


When Choctaw Electric Cooperative began in the 1940s, gasoline cost a mere 15 cents/gal. and a Coca Cola was a nickel. During the 50s, gas had gone up to 20 cents a gallon and you could buy a postage stamp for three cents, a gallon of milk for 82 cents and loaf of bread for 14 cents.


The 1960s saw gas at 25 cents/gal. By the 70s gas was up to 36 cents/ gal. and milk was $1.15/gal.


Gas prices climbed to over $1.00/gal. during the 1980s, and up $1.34 by the 90s.


By the year 2000, gasoline cost $1.22/gal., a postage stamp was 33 cents, and a loaf of bread cost $1.72. Since 2010 we have seen gas prices at almost $5.00 per gallon.


No wonder, you can’t get far with a nickel, dime or penny anymore.


CEC CEC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146