This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LED


Continued from Page 9


“The initial cost of LEDs is signifi - cantly higher than conventional lighting,” notes Scott Wil- liams, Western Farmers Elec- tric commercial & indus- trial marketing manager. “Like all modern technol- ogy, you can expect the price to come down as the product develops. However, when you consider all the factors over the life cycle of a light, LEDs have al- ready proved they save money.”


Shedding Light on LEDs Curious to know if LEDs are right for you? Homeown- ers can visit www.energysavers.gov/lighting to compare LEDs to new energy-efficient incandescent bulbs and CFLs. The Touchstone Energy® Cooperatives’ free app, “Save Energy, Save Money” for iPhone, iPad, and Android devices, includes a lighting calculator showing the poten- tial savings from replacing incandescent lamps with either CFLs or LEDs; learn more at www.togetherwesave.com/ Energy-Saving-App-Smartphones. For more in-depth information about LEDs and other types of solid-state lighting, visit www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/ssl. OL


Great bulb, T


Western Farmers Electric Marketing Managers Scott Williams (left) and Kalun Kelley are shown with a Lek- tron LED light fi xture similar to those installed for the T-Bar M Ranch dairy project. Photo Courtesy of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative


Sources: U.S. Department of Energy, Cooperative Research Network, Philips, ENERGY STAR, U.S. Energy Information Administration


Containers For Sale New & Used, 20’, 40’ & 40’HC


• Locally Family Owned • Many to Choose From • Free Local Delivery from 3 Oklahoma Locations





COME DINE WITH AN


OKLAHOMA LEGEND!


bad price


he brilliantly engineered Philips light- emitting diode (LED) lamp that won the $10 million L Prize last year does everything the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked for and more. But since com- ing on the market in late April, analysts warn it may have trouble catching on with consumers because of its $50 price tag. Retailers say similar LEDs are already on the market at less than half that cost. The idea behind the L Prize was to moti- vate lighting manufacturers to design a 60-W lightbulb that would ease the transition as traditional incandescents are phased out over the next few years. Under the federal Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, light- bulbs sold in the United States must be 28 per- cent more effi cient than regular incandescent bulbs (which use 90 percent of their energy producing heat) starting in 2012, and by 2020 they must be 70 percent more effi cient. As a result, time-tested 100-W incandescent bulbs will disappear from store shelves this year, with 75-W, 60-W, and 40-W versions follow- ing by 2014.


When replacing bulbs, consumers must choose between more expensive compact fl uo- rescent lamps (CFLs), LEDs, or new halogen incandescent models that meet the federal standards. CFLs and LEDs both are about 75 percent more effi cient than typical incan- descents. CFLs also last about 10 times lon-


ger than standard incandescent bulbs, while LEDs last about 25 times longer. Retooled incandescents, meanwhile, claim energy sav- ings of 25 percent and a lifespan up to three times longer than their soon-to-be-extinct predecessors. Philips’s entry in the L Prize competition met all of DOE’s challenges for efficiency, output, light quality, and longevity. It emits 910 lumens of light, more than a normal 60-W incandescent, yet consumes less than 10 Wan 83 percent savings in energy. It even features the “warm-white” look consumers prefer, along with omnidirectional light distribution. The bulb is projected to last more than 25,000 hours, while a traditional incandescent lasts about 1,000 hours.


However, it fails the price test badly. Con- test rules “strongly encouraged [the entrants] to offer products at prices that would prove cost effective and attractive to buyers and, therefore, be more successful in the market.” The target retail price, including rebates from utilities, was to be $22 in the fi rst year, $15 in the second, and $8 in the third.


But even a $10 rebate offered by some stores won’t likely take a big enough bite out of a $50 item to lure consumers. Furthermore, Home Depot and other national chains already sell 60-W equivalent LEDs for under $25, includ- ing the 12-W Endura LED from Philips. Source: RE Magazine


1309 South Agnew 1st Light South of I-40


Located in Historic Stockyards City.


www.CattlemensRestaurant.com OPEN 6AM EVERY DAY


405.236.0416 Cattlemen's 08-12-11 Oklahoma Living Magazine Ad.indd 1


Reach 650,000 readers with YOUR ad! Call us today: 405-478-1455


8/12/11 5:16 PM


SEPTEMBER 2012 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146