This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
content@managingwater.co.uk Conservation & the Environment


Urban rivers throughout England and Wales have improved dramatically in water quality and wildlife over the last 20 years.


----


That’s the conclusion of one the largest studies of national trends in river health ever undertaken.


After decades of pollution, typically from poorly treated sewage and industrial waste, rivers in or near Britain’s major urban areas are regaining insects such as mayflies and stoneflies that are typical of fast-flowing, oxygen-rich waters. The range of invertebrates found has also increased, on average, by around 20%.


Researchers from the School of Biosciences carried out an independent analysis of data supplied by the Environment Agency using almost 50,000 samples from thousands of rural and urban locations.


The team puts the general improvement down to industrial decline, tighter regulation and improved wastewater treatment over recent decades.


The recovery has not been universal, however. Rivers in some rural upland areas – such as Wales and parts of northern England – appeared to deteriorate slightly. The team is now investigating these trends further.


Another important finding was that drought years reversed the recovery – at least temporarily.


Dr Ian Vaughan, lead author of the study said: "These important results show how benefits to river biodiversity – the huge array of species that live in our rivers – have arisen from investment and long-term


We have the expertise and specialist equipment available to tackle any and all of your waterway or reed bed management requirements.


UK importer and retailer of the Truxor Harvester, the unique multifunctional amphibious tool carrier.


With its range of 'simple to fit' tools the Truxor can be easily converted to work as a harvester, trash collector, excavator or dredger.


Aquaclear Contracting Specialists in:


restoration intended largely for other ‘river ecosystem services’ such as drinking water and sanitation."


Co-author, Professor Steve Ormerod, added: "While some pollutants are still problematic, there is no doubt that this is a major success story that shows what can be achieved by effective environmental regulation. These are very large improvements not only for river ecosystems, but for the many people who live, work and play along their banks everywhere from Burnley to the Black Country or from Merthyr Tydfil to Cardiff."


Head of Catchment Management at the Environment Agency, David Baxter, said: "High quality environments promote wellbeing and creativity, so improvements in rivers are important for wildlife, people and the economy. It is great to see this independent analysis confirm that urban rivers are recovering, but there is still more work to do. We're working with farmers, businesses and water companies to reduce pollution and improve water quality and we have plans to transform more than 9,500 miles of rivers in England and Wales by 2015."


Lead Author: Dr Ian Vaughan


Co-author: Prof Steve Ormerod 38


Aquatic weed harvesting Dredging and silt pumping Trash and flotsam removal


Ongoing waterway and reed bed management Tel: 01646 641560 Mob: 07775 672 567 info@aquaclear.force9.co.uk


www.aquaclearwatermanagement.co.uk 16 Angle Village


Pembrokeshire SA71 5AT


For all your Land Drainage Requirements


Land Drainage


Cross Country Pipelines


Utility Installation & Trenching Works


• • • • • • •


Other Drainage Works


As well as Agricultural Land Drainage we also specialise in: Irrigation & Water Services Culverts Ditching Works & Watercourse Maintenance Land and Pond Construction Sports Fields and Recreational Areas Caravan Sites (Existing & New Build) Golf Courses / Driving Ranges


E.mail: sales@dmjdrainage.co.uk • Tel: 01205 480 958 • Fax:01205 480 977 DMJ Dranage Ltd, The Offices Medlam Lane, Carrington, Boston, Lincolnshire, PE22 7LU


www.dmjdrainage.co.uk www.fadsdirectory.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44