This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SPECIAL FEATURE Readers' Choice products for 2012 21 22 23


Clopay Rolling Steel Fire Doors March 2012 Clopay Commercial Model CERD10/CERD20 rolling steel fi re doors are UL, FM and ULC labeled to provide up to four hours of fi re pro- tection for standard and oversized openings. Motorized, hand-crank and standard chain-hoist operating systems are offered. An E-Z reset feature makes it easy to drop test and reset the doors from the fl oor without tools or equipment. www.clopaydoor.com


| Circle #121


Cascade Coil Drapery Stainless Steel Wire Mesh Drapery January 2012 Soaring 30-foot fl oor-to-ceiling windows on two sides of Toronto’s latest hot spot, Aria Restau- rant, offer views onto the bustling Air Canada Centre and Maple Leaf Square. Opened in March 2011, the restaurant provides a cool and con- temporary respite from the hubbub of the city’s fi nancial district. Delivering an aura of lightness and drama is


the stainless steel wire mesh window treatments from Cascade Coil Drapery Inc., Portland, Ore., lo- cated against the restaurant’s south wall. Cascade Coil supplied 1,116 square feet of the wire mesh that during the day offers a straightforward view outside. At night, shimmering glimpses of down- town fi lter in, enhancing the restaurant’s sophisti- cated, yet welcoming, ambiance. Aria’s architect and designer, Urszula Tokarska


of Stephen R. Pile Architect Inc., Toronto, says that in addition to diffusing light and facilitating views of the city, Cascade Coil’s stainless steel drapery allows for air circulation across a series of radiant heat convectors. These are situated along the glaz- ing perimeters of the space, helping to maximize Aria’s energy effi ciency.


Aria Restaurant, Toronto Owners: Guido Saldini and Elena Morelli www.cascadecoil.com


24


Winco International Noncombustable Insulation March 2012 Winco International Corp. introduces Skytech and Nest, two new noncombustible, highly refl ective insulation technologies with up to a 13.7 R-Value. Winco’s products are constructed from a superior E-Glass fi lament that turns an 8-inch-thick insulation blanket into a high-density 1/2-inch needled blanket without glue or any binder. This blanket is encapsulated in an aluminum membrane that is 99.39 percent pure aluminum. www.winco-tech.us


| Circle #122 25


| Circle #120 22 METAL CONSTRUCTION NEWS July 2012


Simpson Strong-Tie Curtainwall and Steel Stud Framing Connectors September 2011 Simpson Strong-Tie has developed a new line of connectors for use with curtainwall, steel-stud framing. The new line of slide and fi xed-clip con- nectors has been engineered and tested to eliminate time-consuming calculations required of designers. The Simpson Strong-Tie pre-engineered connec- tors accommodate many different bypass framing applications in stand-offs as large as 11 1/4 inches. For defl ections greater than one inch, or stand-offs greater than 11 1/4-inch, Simpson Strong-Tie can provide custom clips to suit most framing needs. www.strongtie.com


| Circle #123


OpenAire Inc. Skylights October 2011 OpenAire Inc.’s suite of skylights ranges from standard sizes to large-scale, custom skylights with clear spans of up to 300 feet. OpenAire skylights are perfect for a number of applications including: restaurants, hotels, shopping malls, aquatic areas, offi ce atriums, community centers, waterparks and more. OpenAire skylights feature the following design elements: • Energy effi cient • LEED design • Exclusive maintenance-free aluminum truss system and frames


• Open up to 100 percent • Automatic rain sensors • Solar-powered www.openaire.com


| Circle #124 www.metalconst ruct ionnews.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68