This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
“If I could talk with every meeting planner in the world for just a second, I would say, listen, I know a big part of your calling is to create community and to inspire people to do better, to get more out of their potential.”


In the case of a meeting planner, that process in- volves reaching out to more than the people within their organization, right? Yes. Procter & Gamble is a great example of a company that has tried to move away from trying to have everything figured out and perfected up front [by staff], because that makes them extremely risk-averse. It stifles creativity, and Procter & Gam- ble wants to be an innovative company. So what do they do? They learned how to make prototypes. Today, when Procter & Gamble goes out to develop new ideas, they start with card- board and duct tape — and they go to the potential customer and say, “What do you think?” And they get the feedback from the potential user very early. What the senior executives at Procter & Gamble have found


is that when they share these prototypes with people early, two things happen: One, the user feels much more empowered to provide feedback and feels much more included in the creative process. And so that creates a lot of loyalty. And it also gets much-needed user feedback so that they are able to develop new pioneering ideas that are in line with user needs. The sec- ond thing they have learned is that internally [this process] has become very helpful in reducing emotional attachment that people have to their ideas, which can be another impediment to doing anything creative.


How should a planner position changes at a confer- ence so that participants are aware of them and can be part of the improvement process? I have seen people successfully handle this two ways. One is by


www.pcma.org





FROM THE BOOK: “Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin didn’t set out to create one of the fastest-growing startup compa- nies in history; they didn’t even start out seeking to revolutionize the way we search for information on the web. Their first goal, as collaborators on the Stanford Digital Library Project, was to solve a much smaller problem: how to prioritize library searches online.”


saying to people up front that this is an experiment — a little bet that we are making because we are trying to do something more innovative and creative and we realize it is not going to be perfect. We are looking for your help in developing this idea. The other word that I think is very valuable is to call something a “lab.” I think Google pioneered this idea with the Google Lab — a place where they put all their trial ideas. They go ahead and play with it, but it is just in a lab. “Beta” is another word that resonates with people, especially people in technol- ogy. Either of those terms can really help to frame the expecta- tions of the audience, which is a really important thing.


Do you attend any meetings on a regular basis? What do you look for when you accept either to attend or to speak at a conference? I pay attention to whether the group has a lot creative or inno- vative people supporting it. I am an extremely curious person, so [I will accept speaking engagements] as long as the audience is open to listening. There are some audiences who just look at me as entertainment and don’t really care about learning from


pcma convene February 2012 71


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110