This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
Convention Centers in HighlyWalkable Places


8. Baltimore Convention Center


Walk Score: 89 The redevelopment of the Inner Harbor


area of Balti-


more’s downtown was spearheaded by the openingof the Baltimore Convention Center in 1979. A retail and restaurant complex opened on the waterfront the next year, followed by an aquarium,museums, nightlife, restaurants, sports venues, and more than 8,500 hotel rooms—all within walkingdistance of the center. The compact downtown, in fact, is one of Visit Balti- more’s key sellingpoints: “In Baltimore, you’re two feet away from everything.”


one of the best shopping streets in America by U.S. News &World Report, and within walkingdistance of more than 100 hotels, restaurants, sports venues, and nightlife.


10. Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center


Walk Score: 86 Located on thewaterfront,


9. Minneapolis Convention Center


Walk Score: 89 Minneapolis’ cityscape


surrounds a green park system,


which helped the city earn a No. 9 spot onWalk Score’s list of top 10 walkable U.S. cities. The Minneapolis Convention Center is in the heart of downtown, one block from the Nicollet Mall, named


the LongBeach Convention


complex is within an eight-block radius of about 100 restaurants. Most of the city’s 5,000 hotel rooms are within walkingdistance of the complex, and a pedestrian promenade links hotels, shops, and restaurants. A burgeoningarts district has sprungup in the city’s East Village—and for added walking pleasure, there’s the genesis of the city’s name: five-and-a-half miles of sandy beaches.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110