This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
“[Volunteer time] is even more precious than money. Americans are working more now than anyother country in the world, and the amount of time our members have to volunteer for their associations has never been less.” —Mark Thorsby


because the board and the committee already will be on the same page. Of course, that’s not to say that new initiatives can’t get


funded without board members on the volunteer committee. Rather, “you have to make sure you have done your home- work and politick correctly behind the scenes,” Romello said, “so that it is not a surprise” to non-commit- tee board members.


Money, Time, and Mission Following HRPS’s budget-busting show in Las Vegas, advance communication with volunteer committees about what was and wasn’t financially realistic became a priority. Waldron didn’t want to suppress ideas before they got floated, or to squelch the enthusiasm of her volunteers—but she had to make sure that everything that was beingproposed or enacted by the committee was beingbalanced alongthe way by revenue streams. “Communication at every turn [was important],”Wal-


dron said. “Every couple of weeks there were meetings to dis- cuss, ‘Here are the ideas, here are the actual costs. And here is where we can cover for this in terms of revenue generation.’ That helped the process.” Good communication also is important in terms of get- tingthe most and best ideas out of your volunteers. Initially


“Ultimately, the buck stops with the staff. Once a volunteer committee leaves, your regular employees are the ones that are going to have to clean up the mess and continue with the organization.”


you want to encourage them to contribute their greatest thinking, and to be uninhibited in what they come up with. It’s the staff’s job to rein in ideas due to budgetary concerns. “You want to keep the momentum always up,”Waldron said, “and keep them on a high and keep them prepared to do the work that is ahead of them.” And yet, “Ultimately, the buck stops with


CERTIFICATION MADE POSSIBLE


the staff,”Waldron said. “Once a volunteer committee leaves,…your regular employees are the ones that are going to have to clean up the mess or maintain and continue with the organization.” Besides money, another resource that someone managing volunteer committees


must take care not to waste is time, accordingto SmithBuck- lin’s Mark Thorsby, CAE, vice president of SmithInstitute. “[Volunteer time] is even more precious than money,” Thorsby said. “That is probably never more true than today. Americans are workingmore now than any other country in the world, and the amount of time our members have to vol- unteer for their associations has never been less.” The best way to squander volunteers’ time is to direct


them poorly. What often happens, Thorsby said, is that— out of a desire for committees to be independent and creative —they’re not given any direction. “And hence, as a result, they are sort of like water—they find their own way,” Thorsby said. “But to what end? An awful lot of committees finish their year frustrated with a sense that they have accom- plished nothing. Which should not be surprising given the fact that they did not start out to accomplish anything.” It’s the responsibility of your board and staff to focus the


volunteer committee from the outset on a very specific mis- sion. “Here is what we want to accomplish,” Thorsby said, as an example of what you should say to your committee. “How you guys get that done is really up to you given the time and financial constraints.”


You Better Recognize In the past, NPGA held a one-day summer planningmeeting for its volunteer committee—but all that work packed into continued on page 54


www.pcma.org pcmaconvene February 2012 51


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110