This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
Take Away


Creating credible metrics can be tricky, but it is essential.


process for designing and measuring meeting resultswithinSMMP. More than 20 years ago, Kerns developed a


method for measuring the psychological and behavioralimpacts of meetings on attendees and sponsors:ROE.“We incorporated theROI Insti- tute’s well-accepted method of measuring the financial impacts of meetings into our online sys- tem about six years ago ... to assure [that] our approachtoresultsmeasurement addressed the full spectrum of meeting dimensions,” Kerns said. Simply put, ROE is the movement between a


pre-andpost-meeting measurement ofanattendee’s rating for a specific meeting dimension. Kerns said: “I suggest that planners view return on event as an umbrella concept that includes the financial measurement of ROI; then they can track all


Kerns recommends adopting a pre- and post-


measurement process on keymeeting benchmark questions used in both surveys for results-tracking purposes, so planners can calculate and compare attendees’ pre- and post-meeting survey levels (see below). “If you only have post-meeting meas- urements,” he said, “it is impossible tobenchmark improved perceptions, attitudes, knowledge/skills, behaviors, and impacts.” The value of being able to produce accurate,


measured results using theROEprocess can ben- efit both corporate and association planners, as it is a method not only for maximizing meeting value, but also for demonstrating that value with accurate, clear information that is easily commu- nicated to the C-suite. Creating credible metrics can be tricky, but it is


The ROE Process for Defining a Meeting’s Value Pre-Meeting: Needs Analysis


Discoverysurvey—qualitative,usingopen-endedquestions Baselinesurvey—quantitative,usingbenchmark,multiple-choicequestions


Post-Meeting: Measuring Value


Benchmark tracking Follow-up impact/ROI survey


Taking a Rational Approach There has been much debate on the issue of measuring the ROI in meetings and events. Some people characterize any ROI measurement as seri- ously flawed. Others passionately charac- terize ROI as the answer to their accountability woes. The truth probably lies somewhere in between these two extreme viewpoints. The important point is to understand the drivers for the ROI process and the inherent weaknesses and advantages of measuring ROI. Then it is possible to take a rational approach to the issue and imple- ment an appropriate mix of evaluation strategies. —Professional Meeting


Management, Fifth Edition


aspects of meeting-management outcomes.” During a meeting’s life cycle, there are key


points atwhich specialized surveys can be used to provide information toenablemeeting planners to design relevant content and agenda structures, and to accurately measure results. The flowchart on p. 42 illustrates this.


Measure Twice “It is important to understand that there is a spectrumof well-defined, specific types of meeting impacts to bemeasured,” Kerns said, “that includes people’s views and feelings, behaviors, business impacts, and financial results.”


www.pcma.org


essential.Yes,weall want to squeeze more dollars fromthe bottomline—but if plannersdonot have a complete meeting-value analysis, includingROE, then their value equation is compromised. “Meeting value” will of course have different


meanings to different people within your organi- zation. The good news is that planning and pro- curement teams cannowcreate and communicate a multitude of critical meeting benefits and strate- gic outcomes.Remember, stakeholder management is a big part of a meeting planner’s job description, and delivering a combination of powerfulROIand ROE outcomes will have a big impact on your organization—and your career. 


 JenniferW. Brown, CMP, is president of Meeting Sites Resource, a global specialist in meeting- site research and hotel- contract negotiations. The company also offers professional meeting support services, SMMP consulting, and advanced technology solutions. Fora complimentary copy of Brown’s “ROI/ROE Checklist,” contact herat jbrown@meetingsites.net.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110