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Electrifying Student: Trey Dumler


When shopping for caulk, there are myriad choices.


Prices range from a couple of dollars to several dollars per tube, so be sure to read the labels and choose a product that will adhere best to the materials you’re sealing. If your budget allows, spend a little more for a higher- quality caulk. Inexpensive caulks may last only a few years, while premium-priced caulks are rated for 20 years or more. Caulk like a Pro  As a rule of thumb, you’ll probably use half a cartridge per window or door and up to six cartridges for foundation work.


 Most caulks pose no known health hazards after they’re fully cured. However, some high-performance caulking compounds contain irritating or potentially toxic ingredients, so you should carefully read the manufacturer’s instructions and take precautions.


 The best time to apply caulk is during dry weather when outdoor temperatures are above 45 degrees. Low humidity is important during application to prevent cracks from swelling with moisture.


 Before applying new caulk, remove the old caulk or paint residue with a putty knife, stiff brush, or solvent.


 Make sure your work area is dry, avoid sealing in moisture.  Hold the caulking gun at a consistent 45 degree angle.  Caulk in a straight, continuous stream, avoiding stops and starts, and make sure the caulk sticks to both sides of the crack or seam.


 Release the trigger on the caulking gun before pulling it away from the crack to prevent applying too much caulk. A caulking gun with an automatic release makes this much easier.


 Don’t skimp. If the caulk shrinks, reapply it to form a smooth bead that completely seals the crack.


 If caulk oozes out of a crack, push it back in.  Once you’ve applied caulk, it takes time for it to dry, or cure. Curing time is described in two ways. The tack-free time tells you how quickly the fresh caulk’s outer surface will dry or skin over. The total cure time indicates the time required for the caulk to reach the point where no further drying or shrinking will occur.


 Don’t allow pets and small children to come into contact with fresh caulk.


Find more ways to seal your home and save at www. energysavers.gov or www.TogetherWeSave.com.


Sources: U.S. Offi ce of Energy Effi ciency and Renewable Energy, ENERGY STAR, and product manufacturers


B


eing committed to community is one of the requisites of receiving Tri-County Electric Cooperative’s Electrifying Student award. According to Ron Glenn, a faculty


member at Tyrone High School, Trey Dumler exemplifi es this principle in several ways. “Trey has a deep commitment to helping others succeed, and he always upholds the highest degree of personal integrity,” Glenn said. “Trey demonstrates commitment to community by serving as a mentor to underclassmen. He also helps lead his classmates by serving as Senior Class President.” When asked about his desire to help others, Trey humbly


replied, “I want to see others succeed and not struggle through high school.” Trey is well-qualifi ed to tutor his peers and others as he has maintained a perfect 4.0 grade average throughout high school. He has also qualifi ed for the National Honor Society list. T is is a solid demonstration of two other requisites to receiving the Electrifying Student award - integrity and accountability. Trey has worked with approximately 20 underclassmen since


his Freshman year, helping them to overcome their obstacles in Mathematics and Science. He has given more than 100 hours of his time in the service of others here at the school. When he’s not giving his time to others, Trey takes classes


online through Oklahoma Panhandle State University in addition to his full course load of high school classes. He is also a member of student council, band and choir. Trey is currently a senior at Tyrone High School. After graduation, he plans to major in Pre-Medicine at the University of Oklahoma to become a radiologist. Trey’s parents are Mike and Billi Dumler.


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