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• Find parents and other community members that play instruments or sing, who could enhance a given performance of your ensemble. Plan a world music piece that needs a traditional instrument which one of your parents play. Be purpose- ful in drawing your community musicians into your classroom or performance. Students will benefit from knowing that there is musical life after high school.


• Invite a local community official with musical experience to conduct your ensemble for the concert. Help them to remember what the power of music does for the soul.


Parents will continue to be an important element of support and advocacy for school music programs. Music teachers can support the development of musical experiences beyond our schools by provid- ing opportunity and information to parents and other community members who wish to understand the power of music for themselves. Whether we strive to “Get America Singing” or playing, music will convey its own powerful story.


Notes:


1. Teaching traditions were observed in schools during the People to People Music Education delegation trip in Dec. 2009.


2. The Venda traditions are described in A. Emberly & J. Davidson (2011). From the Kraal to the Classroom: Shifting Musical Arts Practices From the Community to the School With Spe- cial Reference to Learning Tshigom- bela in Limpopo, South Africa. IJME, 29, 265-282.


3. J. L. Kerchner & C. R. Abril (2010). Musical Experience in Our Lives: Things We Learn and Meanings We Make. New York: R & L Education.


Sheila Feay-Shaw is associate professor of music education at UW-Milwaukee. Email: feayshaw@uwm.edu


Wisconsin School Musician


University Opera, Fall 2011


A world-class university— a world-class school of music.


Final Auditions for Admission in Fall 2012


Feb. 25, 2012 (application due January 31)


School of Music Undergraduate Admissions 608.263.5986


admissions@music.wisc.edu music.wisc.edu/facebook


Apply online: music.wisc.edu 47


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