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BAHRAin And KuwAiT The recent troubles that engulfed the states of Bahrain and Kuwait have resulted in the local authorities realising that they have to spend money on basic infrastructure including healthcare to ease the demands of the population. This coupled with the spread of lifestyle diseases and government initiatives to promote private sector investment, will result in the growth of the healthcare infrastructure. Kuwait has set aside around KD 73 billion (US$ 127 billion) to spend on hospital projects in the next four years, according to Middle East Healthcare expert. The project plans are reportedly die to an increase in Type 2 diabetes and obesity across the GCC and a rise in demand for beds, as well as a growing desire to bring healthcare tourism to the region.


INVESTMENT GCC HEALTHCARE


QATAR


The spend on healthcare construction projects in Qatar closely matches that of the UAE. This is due to the large reserves of oil and gas found in the country. Qatar has witnessed a rapid growth in the number of private healthcare facilities, with 91 new ones established in the last year, and many more forecast to come as the country prepares the infrastructure for the population explosion that will come with the 2022 World Cup. Two new private hospitals, that have already been granted licenses, are expected to be established this year whilst the licensing procedures for another three hospitals are currently underway. Current build projects include Hamad Medical Corporation and Sidra Medical City.


OmAn Oman’s private healthcare sector has seen a steady growth in recent times, thanks to a number of government schemes to encourage private sector investment in this sector. The government gives support to the private healthcare sector. In addition, the MoH provides the private sector with all the technical support that they need to start their hospitals or clinics. Today, Oman has 817 private clinics compared to 471 in 1995. In addition, there are 398 private general clinics, which are widely distributed across the regions. There are also a number of specialised clinics and polyclinics that provide specialised services; their number has grown to 204 compared to only 28 in 1995. Currently, the MoH in Oman is working to further promote the private sector outside Muscat. Today, 22% of physicians, 60% of dentists and 74% of pharmacists in Oman work in the private sector.


Hospital Build Issue 4 2011


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