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Sensors & Transducers


recognition for gaming, more secure air- signatures, and advanced 3D UIs. Once you’ve got your gesture database defined, you need to enable the gestures to be recognised on your host platform, whether that’s a DTV or a STB. Software running on the host platform needs to communicate with the remote control, receive data, recognise gestures, and communicate events or processed data to other applications running on the DTV or STB. This motion middleware is required to deliver on the promise and value of motion control and to distribute motion services to a range of client applications. Movea’s SmartMotion Server, which runs on standard STB and DTV platforms, is able to deliver advanced gesture recognition and motion processing capabilities for applications running on the DTV and STB. It is able to recognise different device capabilities and enables communication between SmartMotion enabled devices and applications by providing a standard interface devices and applications.


In conclusion, motion technologies will play a critical role in driving mass adoption of these new innovations and MoveTV could certainly help pave the way by providing the Pay TV ecosystem with a unifying platform on which to deliver a complete motion-enabled entertainment experience for consumers.


Movea | www.movea.com


Dave Rothenberg is the Worldwide Marketing Manager at Movea


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