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OCTOBER 2011 


October is Co-op Month CEC INVITES MEMBERS TO JOIN THE CELEBRATION


W


hen the economy is uncertain and the country’s leaders can’t seem to agree what to do about it, it’s good to know that


your neighbors have your back.


One of those good neighbors is your electric cooperative. Choctaw Electric Cooperative is locally owned. In fact, you and your neighbors own it.


CEC joins cooperatives everywhere in celebrating Co- op Month, and the co-op way of doing business. A cooperative is owned by


meetings annually, allowing members to elect fellow consumers to guide the co-op and have a say in how their utility is run.


CEC celebrates Co-op Month wth punch and cookies for members!


Tuesday, October 11............................Idabel Wednesday, October 12....................Hugo Thursday, October 13.........................Antlers


the people who use its services, so this celebration includes you and every CEC member.


As a member-owner, you have a say in how your electric cooperative operates. You may attend the cooperative’s annual membership meeting, vote for which of your neighbors may sit on its board of directors, or even run for a seat on the board yourself.


The bright idea for co-ops comes from seven simple principles. These principles require that a cooperative must be open for anyone to join. Every member retains one voice, one vote. Electric co-ops hold member business


There also have to be real member benefits. For example, members of electric co-ops often get money back (called capital credits or patronage refunds) when the co-op’s in good financial shape. More than $9.5 billion has been returned to members by electric co-ops since 1988—and that’s nothing to sneeze at.


Education remains another big focus. Electric


co-ops provide safety information in schools, share ideas on how to make your home more energy efficient to keep electric bills affordable, and make sure elected officials and opinion leaders know about the co-op business model. Because there is strength in numbers, co-ops tend to stick together when tackling regional and national issues.


Perhaps most important of all, co-ops are independent and community-focused, not tied to the purse strings of far-flung investors. Co-ops help drive local economic development, fund scholarships, support


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local charities, and work to make life better in the areas they serve—the heart of the cooperative difference. Your co-op is a community business, and it always has been.


Learn more about cooperatives and the principles that define them at www.go.coop.


CEC


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