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OKLAHOMA EAT S Fall Chicken Apple Salad


Green Tomato Apple Pie Homemade Applesauce


turns helping my grandma cut up the fresh apples to be cooked and helping my grandpa run them through the food mill. I’m still partial to homemade apple- sauce and I can never bring myself to buy the store-bought kind. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do! As a young girl, one of my most memorable cooking experiences was helping my mom put together an apple pie. We had the bottom crust rolled out when my mom left the kitchen to check on my little brother. I decided to surprise her and fi nish the pie by myself. Just like I’d seen her do many times before, I cut up the apples and put them in the crust, sprinkled them with cinnamon sugar, put the top crust on and pinched it shut. When my mom came back she helped me put it in the oven and an hour later we discovered that I had made an apple pie with unpeeled apples!


Apples G


No-sugar-added Applesauce Yields approximately 1 quart 6 lb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . apples


1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cinnamon stick (optional) Quarter the apples and remove the seeds. It’s not necessary to peel the apples. Add enough water to a large pot to just coat the bottom. Add the cinnamon stick and the apples and cover the pot. Cook over medium-low heat for approximately 30 min- utes, until the apples are very soft. Place a food mill over a large bowl. Run the apples through the mill. The mill will push the applesauce into the bowl and prevent the skins from getting into the sauce.


Fall Chicken Apple Salad Serves 4 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . chicken breasts salt


pepper olive oil ½ cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pecans 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . small apple 1 t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lemon juice ¼ cup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . dried cherries 1/8 cup. . . . . . . . . . . . . fi nely chopped celery 1/8 cup . . . . . . . . . . . . chopped red onion ¼ cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mayonnaise


¼ cup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . sour cream Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken breasts with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil.


30 OKLAHOMA LIVING


A couple years later, I redeemed myself, winning an apple pie contest at our local grocery store with a Green Tomato Apple Pie. T e victory was thanks to my grandma, whose crust and pie recipes I used. With her permission, I’m passing them along to you. My grandma always uses lard to make a fl aky crust (and she’s the healthiest 88 year old I know), but you can substitute vegetable shortening in its place. I’m also including one of my own apple recipes – a chicken salad with bits of sweet, crunchy apple in it. Enjoy!


- Laura Araujo


Bake for approximately 15 minutes, until the chicken is fully cooked. Meanwhile, toast the pecans in a dry skillet over me- dium-high heat. Shake the pan frequently and watch the nuts closely so they don’t burn. Chop the cooled nuts into small pieces. Core the apple, chop it into small chunks and sprinkle it with lemon juice to keep it from browning. When the chicken is cool, chop it into bite-sized pieces. Place the chicken, pecans, cherries, apple, celery and red onion in a bowl. Dress with the mayonnaise and sour cream. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve the chicken salad on croissants.


Green Tomato Apple Pie Yields 1 pie 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . apples 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . green tomatoes 1 T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lemon juice ½ cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . granulated sugar ½ cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . brown sugar ¼ cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fl our 1 t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cinnamon ¼ t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nutmeg pinch of salt 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pie crusts (see recipe to the right) 4 T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . butter


Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Peel and core the apples and cut them into thin slices. Slice the tomatoes into pieces that are the same thickness as the apples. Place the apples and tomatoes into a bowl and sprinkle them with the lemon juice. Add the sugar, brown sugar, fl our, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt and toss to coat the fruit. Place a crust in the bot-


tom of the pie pan and trim it so that it only hangs over the edge about an inch. Add the fruit mixture. Cut the butter into several small pieces and scatter them over the top of the fruit. Place the top crust over the fruit. Trim the crust if needed. Fold the bottom crust over the top crust and pinch to seal. Cut vents in the top to allow steam to escape. Bake for 15 minutes at 425 degrees. Reduce the temperature to 350 degrees for 45 minutes more. If the crust starts to brown too much, cover the outside edges with foil and continue baking.


My Grandma's Pie Crust Yields 5 crusts 5 cups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fl our 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . egg 3/4 cup. . . . . . . . . . . . . milk pinch of salt


1 lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fat (lard or vegetable shortening) Measure the fl our into a large bowl. Place the egg in a liquid measuring cup and add enough milk to reach the 1-cup line (approximately 3/4 cup of milk). Use a fork to mix the egg and milk together. Make a well in the center of the fl our and add the milk mixture. Add the pinch of salt and stir the fl our and wet ingredients together. Mix the fat into the dough with a pastry cutter or your hands, until just combined. Don’t overwork the dough or it will become tough. Form the dough into 5 discs of equal size. Place them in the refrigerator to chill for at least 30 minutes. For the apple pie, roll out 2 of the discs into 11-inch circles. To transfer the dough to the pie pan, fold it in half and then in half again. Wrap extra dough in a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of foil and freeze. OL


For more of Laura’s recipes visit: http://mannaandquail.wordpress.com for Apples


rowing up with 50 acres of apple trees in our backyard, each fall brought my family an abundance of apples. Since we didn’t maintain the trees, the apples were not the prettiest, but they were perfect for cooking. We’d spend a whole day canning enough homemade applesauce to last a year. I’d take


Photos by Laura Araujo


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