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ElectraLite Make a fall energy check list


The best time to make sure your house is ready for winter is long before the cold weather arrives. Here is a fall energy check- list:


• Call a licensed, qualified heating technician to service your furnace or boiler.


• Change the filters in your heating system to ensure air can pass through and your heater will work efficiently during the winter.


• Caulk and weather strip around windows and doors to keep heated air from leaking out through cracks or gaps. • Have a chimney sweep clean and inspect your wood-burning fireplace before you light the first fire of the season. • Test smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms before you use your gas or wood fireplace. Change their batteries. • Replace the batteries in your digital or programmable thermo- stat before heating season begins. • If you don’t have a programmable thermostat, consider having one installed at the time of your heating system inspection. It can help you save energy and money on your heating bill by automati- cally turning the heat down every day when you leave for work or go to bed. 811110102


The cost of cool continued Looking at the next graph, its easy to see


how much the unit cycled during the day to maintain the temperature inside and the period from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. was not much dif- ferent that the recovery time during the prior day. Total energy consumed on this day was 35 kwh, a 65.7% increase in consumption from varying the temperature during the day. For the third example, I lowered the tem-


perature by 4º to 72º. It’s easy to see right off that the unit is cycling much more frequently and during the hottest part of the day it ran non- stop trying to maintain the temperature. Total energy consumed for this day was 48 kwh. This is a 73% increase in consumption for just a 4º change. If you look at each of the graphs, in addition


to the longer run times because of the increase in temperature, the load measured by the meter actually increased as well. To summarize the results of these comparisons, please see the table below. Please keep in mind that the figures used are only examples and may not be similar to your consumption. There are a lot of variables to consider when comparing these figures to your situ- ation such as, number of people in the home, insu-


OCTOBER 2011


Switching to CFLs


It’s not cheap to switch your


energy-efficient incandescent light bulbs to long-burning, compact fluorescent lamps, but you’ll save money in the long run by replacing the bulbs less often and by using less electricity to burn them. So if you’ve noticed that your CFLs are burning out too soon, it could be that you’re buying the wrong kind.


Normal CFLs aren’t designed for use with dimmers. And they don’t last as long if you use them in enclosed areas or where there’s excessive heat, vibration or fluc- tuations in power. Some tips:


• Before you buy a bulb for a dimmer or another special use, check its label to learn if it’s made for that. Some CFLs work in dim- mers, motion sensors or three-way sockets, for example. But not all of them do.


• Buy the right size bulb for the fixture. Using a larger bulb or one that burns brighter than recom- mended for a lamp or ceiling fix- ture can cause the bulb to overheat and burn out prematurely. • Avoid placing CFLs in en- closed indoor fixtures. The lack of air circulation and increased heat can reduce its life.


• Choose a special, more-du-


rable CFL for use in an overhead fan light, which can vibrate and disturb the bulb.


lating values, infiltration, and unit efficiency. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate what an impact a little change in habits can have.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


BEGINNING BALANCE 7/31/11.........$143,532.86 Deposits ......................................................... 7,509.71 Interest Income ....................................................6.17 Checks Issued ...............................................-6,418.01 Approved, not yet paid ................................-7,549.66 BALANCE 8/31/11.............................. $137,081.07


• If you’re using CFLs out- doors, find bulbs designed for ex- terior use, and check the package to learn if the bulbs can withstand cold temperatures. • Turning a CFL on and off frequently can shorten its life. Try to leave the CFL on for at least 15 minutes at a time.


Honor Old Glory by attending the 11th Annual Dignified Disposal of Unserviceable Flags Ceremony, 6 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 11 at the cooperative’s office, Interstate 40 and U.S. Highway 377. The event is sponsored by Canadian Valley Elec- tric Cooperative and American Legion Post 260 of Tecumseh, Post 64 of Chandler, and Post 123 of Oke- mah. Two $500 U.S. Savings Bonds will be awarded to one high school and one middle school student for their essays “What Does the Flag Mean To Me?” Ham- burgers, hot dogs and soft drinks will be served.


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