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of the density of table gaming here in Macau, the buy-ins are so large and the number of notes so great that there is a recurring break point in games. To process a buy-in, the notes are fanned and inspected with a wand, approved by the pit boss, collected and put into a drop box. We’ve timed this process and it can take over two minutes for 40 notes to be accepted. In that break point, no one is making any money. T e player can’t play. Nobody wins.” As it stands, the prototype is too


bulky to be useful but if JCM can bring its size down, it is a sure-fi re winner for Asian casinos. With a presence at G2E Asia that


generated a lot of positive comment, Novomatic brought a strong line- up of slot


titles to go with its elec-


tronic multi-player installation based on Novoline Novo Unity II. Aſt er Novomatic’s relatively recent acquisi- tion of Octavian assets, its fully scal- able systems products and jackpots were another highlight. T e latest Super-V+ Gaminator


multi-game mixes were presented in two groups of Super-V+ Gaminator cabinets that were linked within the Octavian


casino management


system ACP (Accounting Control Progressives System) and connected to a new mystery progressive jackpot theme called ‘Wild Nights’.


Multi-tasking at play Novomatic’s Novostar SL2 slant- top was used to show a selection of CoolFire II games,


this cabinet be-


ing particularly fl exible as it comes in three diff erent modular versions: Novostar SL1 with one monitor for multi-player


installations; Novostar


SL2 with two monitors; and Novostar SL3. T e SL2 and SL3 versions feature a fl ip-screen feature, so the player can use either of the two main screens to play, and an extra start button in the foot rest. T is was the fi rst outing for the


SL1, and it was used to great eff ect to show Novomatic’s electronic multi- player installation based on the inno-


vative Novoline Novo Unity II system. T e new feature of the system is


the fl exible interconnection of a great variety of electronic live games and slot games with a virtually unlim- ited number of individual player sta- tions. T is multi-game functionality allows the operator to link any cho- sen number of terminals to diff er- ent games such as roulette, baccarat, poker, blackjack, sic bo and bingo as well as a great slot games off ering – all within one installation. A noticeable change at Macau’s


casinos, aside from the increasing use of slots, is the apparent acceptance of electronic automated gaming – in sic bo and roulette, for example. T is is an area where Alfastreet has scored some success around the world – no- tably in South America and Asia – and the company is now rolling out a new product in this fi eld.


63 It is a multi-game terminal with a


twist – the twist being that the player can play two games simultaneously. For example, if the player selects rou- lette, he or she can choose two wheels, and just keep playing. It means down- time for the player is minimal and stimulation is maximal. Alfastreet’s Albert Radman says:


“T is will be placed in large numbers around Asia in the very near future. We already have an installation at Marina Bay Sands, Singapore, of 40 units, and it’s working well.” T ere was much more to see at


G2E Asia. T e show has picked up af- ter a couple of quiet years, with a great buzz about the fl oor and a feeling of business being done. G2E Asia 2011 has re-established the event as one of the gaming industry’s Big Four, along with SAGSE Buenos Aires, London’s ICE and G2E Las Vegas.


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