This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
50


Gaming


“Pool parties provide an additional experience for visitors to Macau, and that is always good for the issue of entertainment diversity. I think they only have limited spillover effect on gaming revenue,” gaming expert Desmond Lam says


Venetian’s entertainment team. “At the time we saw a lack of unique and exciting parties in the region.” In July 2009, the Venetian brought in Hed Kandi to throw its


 rst pool party in Macau. “It was a smash success. We’ve planned at least three this year and we are looking to increase the amount of events around the pool,” says Ms Ma. “This sort of outdoor fun has universal appeal. Anyone who


enjoys letting loose, having wet fun, seeing beautiful boys and girls in sexy out ts will love these parties.” On the other side of the road in Cotai, City of Dreams is also


betting heavily on pool parties. After a successful Halloween pool party last year, Melco Crown decided to create a branded pool party series for 2011 that will span the summer months, a spokesperson says. The series includes world-class DJs and music channel MTV as media partner. “It has always been City of Dreams’ vision to provide the


most varied and interesting range of entertainment experiences for our guests, and this is yet another event that helps us enrich their stay here,” the spokesperson says.


Pooping punters Pools are among the main features of Galaxy Macau. It boasts the world’s largest skytop wave pool, covering 4,000 square metres. However, pool parties are not in the pipeline for now. “Given the high demand already for the pool facilities, we


don’t have a great need right now to promote the grand resort deck and its adjacent areas as party venues,” a Galaxy Macau spokesperson says. “We are thinking, of course, of planning large public parties in the future. However, at the moment the grand resort deck is made available only to hotel guests.”


JULY 2011


City of Dreams Even though some of the pool partygoers also gamble, Des-


mond Lam Chee Shiong, an expert on Chinese gambling psychol- ogy at the University of Macau, says these events are not meant to appeal to traditional hardcore gamblers. “It provides an additional experience for visitors to Macau, and that is always good for the issue of entertainment diversity. I think they only have limited spillover effect on gaming revenue,” Mr Lam says. “These parties target the younger generation and I don’t think


they will be effective in attracting new gamblers. In Las Vegas, day, night and pool clubbing are now very popular too. These at- tract a different crowd of people who don’t gamble.” Pool parties started in Las Vegas as long ago as 2004. Nowa-


days, there are several designated venues for pool parties and the market is big enough for different segments to be targeted. In Macau, the interest among mainland visitors in pool par-


ties is growing, the Venetian’s Ms Ma says. “From a big-picture perspective, we believe Macau will come to be seen as a world- class destination for partying, just like Las Vegas and Ibiza. Pool parties are a key to developing this image.” The thinking is similar at City of Dreams. “With more gener-


ations of af uent young adult Chinese willing to spend travel time and dollars for a truly fun- lled hangout escape with friends,” its spokesperson says, “pool parties are de nitely an ultimate social gathering choice. These pool parties provide an unusual and ex- cellent party experience for them.” The University of Macau’s Mr Lam is less sanguine. He be-


lieves the attraction of such events to mainland visitors is limited. “Such parties will be more effective as corporate incentive events for companies,” he says. “This may be used to support the meet- ings and conventions industry and tourism initiatives.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132