This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
American Airlines success is built on the breadth of their network and frequency of their fl ights, serving 250 cities in over 40 countries. Every day they offer up to 18 fl ights from Heathrow and Manchester direct to the U.S. including New York and Miami as well as onward connections to other destinations.


INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY CLASS FEATURES: • Online check-in or self service check-in kiosks at the airport. • Comfortable leather seat with six-way adjustable headrest. • Personal seatback TV with complimentary headset. • Complimentary non-alcoholic beverage and meal service. • Shared in-seat power ports.


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CLASS FEATURES: • Online check-in, self service check-in kiosks or separate Flagship check-in at the airport. • Admiral’s Club lounge access and arrivals lounge facilities at some airports.


• Lie-fl at seats with advanced lumbar support, six-way adjustable headrest, privacy divider and cotton duvet with oversized pillow.


• Amenity Kit including Burt’s Bees products. • Personal video or entertainment media player. • Complimentary alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and full meal service. • Individual power port and in-seat telephone.


ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE USA


All visitors to the United States (U.S.) including children who are eligible for the Visa Waiver Programme (VWP) must apply for authorisation to travel to the U.S. in advance in accordance with the Electronic System for Travel Authorisation (ESTA).


You must complete an online application for authorisation to travel on the ESTA website https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta at least 72 hours before your fl ight or sailing to the U.S. departs but you are recommended to apply earlier. Providing the application is accepted, approval will be generated via the website. Approval is usually generated very quickly but can take up to 72 hours if data needs to be checked. You should make a note of the ESTA approval number when you receive it.


In addition to comply with new laws in the United States, all travellers to the USA are now required to supply the following information to their airline:


• Passenger‘s full name as it appears on their passport (including any middle name(s))


• Date of birth • Gender • Redress number where applicable


For further information about the Secure Flight Programme Data (SFPD) please visit www.tsa.gov/what_we_do/layers/securefl ight/


Launched in 2003, Jet2 is one of the UK’s leading low fares airlines, operating 146 routes to 48 destinations across Europe and beyond from Scotland, Northern Ireland and the North of England. Jet2 provides a high level of customer service with a focus on offering sociable fl ight times. On board, Jet2’s dedicated cabin crew provides a range of services including hot and cold refreshments and duty-free shopping.


Please note, the provision of SFPD is a separate requirement to the Electronic System for Travel Authorisation or ESTA.


For guests who have booked a Fly-Cruise with Norwegian Cruise Line, we need to collect this Advanced Passenger information (API) on the airline’s behalf. Please provide the information for each guest on the booking (including children and infants), at your earliest convenience, as failure to do so will mean you cannot download your travel documents. This information can be supplied by completing Online Check-In at https://checkin.ncl.com/.


www.ncl.co.uk • Book today 0845 201 8900


101


FLIGHT INFORMATION


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116