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Stage 6: Tom , straight from his Safety Course under starting instructions from R.O. David Joy. Note Tom is using a Section 2, 3-shot Mossberg pump until he gets his own Section 1 shotgun.


Stage 3 was a four position, 12 plate shoot through and around a pallet frame. There were two positions low down that had curtains of material that needed to be moved aside to see (and shoot) the targets. This isn’t difficult, but the trap is that the curtains can cause the shotgun to fail to eject spent rounds cleanly as it catches in the fabric on its’ way out of the gun. This catches a few competitors out every time. The trick is to stick the gun through the curtains well to the side with the ejection port. Then move the gun to the left sweeping the curtains aside to leave a gap you can both see and shoot through. It also means the material is well out of the way of the gun. Stage 4 was a big field stage, shot primarily from a large central tunnelled area with several “Cooper Tunnel” sections in it. The “Cooper Tunnel” was named for the initial IPSC president Jeff Cooper. It consists of a walled tunnel with wooden slats or bars placed across to form a roof. These slats are not fastened on, but balanced such that is a competitor catches them with his head or anything else, they will likely fall off and thus incur a penalty for each slat. The basic idea is to keep your head down low while scampering through. To make this harder, each cooper tunnel had shooting apertures in, so the competitor had to shoot targets through small holes in the wall.


These stages are definitely easier for the smaller competitor, or someone in their first flush of youth. The oldest competitor on the day was 73 year old Tony Wade, who has been shooting since 1977. He shoots a 12g pump shotgun usually at his home club


of Swadlincote Rifle and Pistol Club in Derbyshire. He has recently moved to a Benelli M2 semi-auto and he’s a mean shot with it He does, however moan every time he sees a low aperture, tunnel or other impediment that means he has to crawl about on hands and knees.


Stage 5 was a quick and simple speed shoot. Each competitor sat at a table with their hands inside a pair of welding gloves screwed to the tabletop. Their gun was loaded in front of them with nine rounds. Down range were four frangible targets at various heights and four steel targets. On the start signal, the competitor simply had to shoot the eight targets as quickly as possible.


Stage 6 was a medium field stage with 16 metal targets, and several no-shoot targets. It was constructed in such a way with walls and pallets that the competitor needed to move all around the stage confines to see and shoot the targets, with half of them only visible from two apertures. With a fully loaded gun in Standard Division, this meant too that the competitor need to load at least seven extra rounds while moving.


This was a good heart thumping stage, fast and fluid would win the day on this stage. With a variety of shooting points for many of the targets, strategy was key. However, some targets were visible from multiple locations that presented harder or easier options. In our squad of about eight people, there were several variants on a theme with this stage


Target Shooter 91


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