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A Tactical Rifle from Valkyrie Rifles by Chris Parkin


It is a proud moment when a gunsmith not only launches his own business but couples this with the release of his own rifle action.


Dave Wylde, proprietor of Valkyrie Rifles has gained a reputation over the last few years, not only as an excellent shooter in a variety of disciplines but also as an accomplished gunsmith, serving his time with Roger Francis at South Yorkshire Shooting Supplies.


Valkyrie are now able to offer rifles built from the ground up and beautifully finished for a variety of disciplines - from uncompromising accurate F-class rifles through bolt-action tactical guns and AR15 derivatives for practical rifle shooters. Dave has coupled his clean and technical precision builds with some of the finest and, dare I say artistic ‘in-house’ Duracoat work yet seen on this side of the Atlantic. Colours and patterns are seemingly limited only by the customer’s imagination and add that unique personal touch to a rifle that, whilst sharing common components and build styles, can be made to look completely different.


24 Target Shooter


Although happily busy with customer work at the moment, Dave has been itching to build a rifle ever since the launch of his Valkyrie turn-bolt action with serial number 0001 for himself. The rifle is a showcase of Dave’s personal component choice and skills library and when I got the chance to test it, I was really looking forward to seeing ‘what the cobbler chooses to wear on his own feet’, so to speak.


The rifle is chambered in the increasingly popular 260 Remington, a cartridge that for the tactical or cross-discipline shooter, offers excellent ballistics out to 1000 yards, coupled with both moderate powder consumption and a reasonable barrel life. The recent introduction of high-quality Lapua brass serves to highlight and increase its popularity.


The Valkyrie action is based on the standard Remington footprint, sharing its dimensions, bolt spacing, magazine and accessory fittings. The difference, as with many custom actions, is the machining standards - plus a few little design tweaks. The original Remington 700 dates back almost half a century and, although it still ‘stands


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