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annually! Whilst much has been written about the revival of Savage’s fortunes it was great to hear it from the very people that made it all happen.


that were on display, many of which were unused examples in mint condition. After a short while Al Kaspar came out and introduced himself as our host Bill Dermody was detained in a meeting so he would step in and show us round.


Al Kaspar is the President of Savage and its Chief Operating Officer and has been with Savage since the time of it’s resurrection through to the present day. Whilst Ron Coburn is probably the name most people know at Savage, being the CEO and instrumental in transforming the company’s fortunes, it is clear that he is surrounded by a team of competent and committed people. Al started with a quick history of the organisation and its journey to its current position as a company that produces approximately 350,000 bolt action firearms


Passing through onto the factory floor, Al explained that the ethos of continual improvements to the processes meant that the factory, whilst still fully operational, was in the middle of some major alterations. The size of the plant meant that the distance covered by a component part such as the action was quite lengthy and so they were re-arranging it and


had recently completed a large shuffle around and were planning the next stage.


Now all this sounds easy but when you consider it means several tonnes of industrial machinery and its associated services you start to feel that it is no mean feat, especially when we found out that it all happens over a weekend and no downtime is predicted in production! Will it be worth the effort? Well, when you consider that the first shuffle shortened the distance that action travelled by hundreds of yards and the associated benefits of that, then you have got to figure that they have got it right again.


At the start of it all were large racks with lengths


50


Target Shooter


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