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has only ever only chambered it in its 40-X series competition rifles, available as special order items through the its Custom Shop facility. What if you’re interested in shooting the 6BR, but want something that’s cheaper, not to mention available before you reach pension age given the length of many gunsmiths’ waiting lists?


So far as ‘off the shelf’ rifles are concerned, Savage is the only large mainstream manufacturer to meet this need with two versions of the Model 12 Long Range Precision Varmint (LRPV), one right bolt/left port with a 1-8 twist 26 inch barrel; the other right bolt/dual port with a slower 1-12 twist rate barrel, also 26 inches.


There are two long-range competition models differentiated by their stocks, the Model 12 F Class and Bench Rest rifles, both with 1-8 twist 30 inch barrels. (Note, twist rate options seem to have changed recently, so some new, more likely secondhand rifles may have 1-12 twist-rate barrels


where I’ve shown a 1 in 8 twist only.)


All are


single-shot – talk to Savage specialist Osprey Rifles if you’re interested in these models or customised versions based on them (http://www.ospreyrifles. com).


There are a few expensive European tactical/sniper switch-barrel rifles from Alpine, SIG-Sauer and Blaser, which have a 6mm Norma BR barrel option listed but for single-shot use only in what are normally magazine rifles. In between price-wise, RPA lists its Interceptor sporter with a 6BR option – I’m sure it was available in target form too at one time but the company’s website doesn’t show it now. (Note: RPA are currently undergoing something of a re-vamp). However, with the cartridge using the standard 0.473” dia. case-head, most people get their 6BR by simply rebarrelling a good quality, accurate rifle that was originally .243 or .308 Win, .22-250 Rem etc calibre.


One major reason for the paucity of 6BR factory


Target Shooter


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