This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Baxter and Iqbal Ubi to name just a few.


Debbie’s shooting story began when she was twenty five years old and unlike George, Debbie was an air rifle shooter. The fact she did not come in to the sport as early as some was of no detriment and during the time she was involved in shooting she was extremely successful. The other true benefit of coming through the ranks and shooting for Great Britain meant she met George whom she later married.


Debbie shot for both England and Great Britain and was English Champion twice. At the Europeans in Finland Debbie was part of the team which set a new team record. Keen for another challenge which also was a benefit to her air rifle shooting Debbie took up 10 metre crossbow shooting, and at that time it was felt this would be a major new sport and was extremely popular.


Nationally she became ladies record holder with a score of 385 and on the international stage Debbie competed in European and World Championships for crossbow and is proud of a top 15 finish at the Worlds. Debbie hasn’t shot since the birth of their son Kenneth in January 1996.


And so another chapter begins. Ken showed an interest in shooting after the family went to a dinner marking Mick Gault’s retirement from England shooting. During the course of his Duke of Edinburgh award Ken needed to find a new sport to master and asked if he could try air pistol. In the enviable position of having a great coach on hand, Ken turned to his father who also decided to get involved once again!


Father and son competed this February in the British Championships where Ken shot 492 and 478 breaking his training best by 50 points in the process. George has continued to coach him and Ken came 5th at the North Wales Open in the junior air pistol category with another personal best. A couple of weeks ago Ken shot 525 at the Cambridge Open and so he continues his early shooting career and follows in his talented parents shooting footsteps. Ken and George use a 7 metre range in the garage at home for training when not at the club, and off the range Debbie feels her son has just the right temperament for the sport of


68 Target Shooter


shooting - he is calm, pretty laid back and he listens well to what he is taught and just gets on and does it. He sounds like the ideal student and I am willing to bet his name is one to look out for over the next few years on the top of scoreboards of competitions.


Ken however is not the only talented Darling youngster. Debbie and George also have a daughter, Samantha who is 12 and the three of them are all keen golfers. Whilst Ken took lessons he wasn’t convinced it was the sport for him and leaves his sister Samantha to excel. She is showing promise with a handicap of 28 and is currently training with the county girls. More importantly she is enjoying it and breaking into a new sport which to make a change for the Darling family has nothing to do with shooting!


Since returning to his old shooting club, George has been asked to do some coaching at the Norwich City club and much to the delight of members including Eddie and father Andy Graver only a week after George began coaching him who won the British Open confined title at Bisley. His coaching is now back in demand since he raised his head above the parapet again and has been approached to coach some of the Isle of Man shooters who are trying to gain selection for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games which take place in 2014.


In Debbie’s own words “who would have guessed that some fifteen years after I gave up shooting and about twenty five years after George gave up shooting and ten since he finished coaching, that our son would bring us back to the shooting world and be so good?”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100