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of specialist divisions for NG Bailey, says: ‘We mainly do work on large stations, but also trackside work too. There are predominantly two main end clients, Network Rail and London Underground, although there are a couple of passenger transport executives we’ve done work for as well. ‘The really big positive about working in the rail sector


Contacts


Builder’s Profi le: www.buildersprofi le.co.uk


CompeteFor: www.competefor. com/business/login.jsp Crossrail: www.crossrail.co.uk Murphy: www.murphygroup.co.uk


May Gurney: www.maygurney.co.uk


Network Rail: www.networkrail.co.uk Osborne: www.osborne.co.uk


Tenders Electronic Daily: http://ted.europa.eu/TED/ main/HomePage.do


is the amount of work there is. It’s diffi cult at the moment because of the cuts, but there is a lot of work to do – there’s a lot of infrastructure improvement work and there’s a lot of work at the larger London stations. If you look at the likes of King’s Cross and Paddington, they’re still got the old Victorian roofs in there. Network Rail gets its funding for fi ve-year periods and, even though it’s always under pressure, it knows broadly what it’s going to do with that. The other advantage for us, with the expertise we have, is that not many people have it. We have a specifi c rail sector business that we’ve developed to target rail, and hardly any of our competitors have that.’


Inside track So how do electrical contractors go about getting a piece of the action? Most improvement work at stations is managed by Network Rail, with some smaller schemes undertaken by train operating companies or passenger transport executives. But Network Rail does not usually employ electricians directly; it has various framework agreements that go to main contractors, which then subcontract work out to specialists. There are three framework agreements for station work: Osborne has the framework agreement for the Southern territory (East Anglia, South Eastern, Southern,


Wessex and Western), London North West is covered by Murphy and the London North East territory is May Gurney. The framework agreements cover work, such as platforms, bridges, lifts and car parks, as well as Network Rail depots and other property. Osborne, May Gurney and Murphy did not respond to ECA


Today’s requests for information about upcoming projects and tendering processes, but Osborne and May Gurney have information on their websites about how to become one of their approved suppliers. Osborne uses the Builder’s Profi le accreditation system to vet its supply chain and invites


Lighting Connection and Control range... 7 things you might not know about


3. We have a range of plugs & sockets to suit almost any lighting requirement.


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54 ECA Today Autumn 2010              


Action stations: the King’s Cross project involves


large-scale deployment of renewables


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