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Megacity Massive migration out of the country and into the city has lead to the rise of the megacity, a term typically used to describe a city with a population of over 10 000 000 inhabitants (Wise- geek.com undated http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-mega- city.htm)


Peri-urban Peri-urban areas are the transition zone, or interaction zone, where urban and rural activities are juxtaposed, and landscape features are subject to rapid modifications, induced by human activities (Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environ- ment 2008 http://www.icsu-scope.org/projects/cluster1/pu- ech.htm)


Polluter Pays Principle


Principle according to which the polluter should bear the cost of measures to reduce pollution according to the extent of ei- ther the damage done to society or the exceeding of an accept- able level (standard) of pollution (United Nations Statistics Division 2006 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/environmentgl/ gesform.asp?getitem=902)


Population connected to urban wastewater collection system Percentage of the resident population connected to the waste- water collecting systems (sewerage). Wastewater collecting systems may deliver wastewater to treatment plants or may discharge it without treatment to the environment (United Na- tions Statistics Division 2009 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/EN- VIRONMENT/wastewater.htm)


Population connected to urban wastewater treatment Percentage of the resident population whose wastewater is treated at wastewater treatment plants (United Nations Sta- tistics Division 2009 http://unstats.un.org/unsd/ENVIRON- MENT/wastewater.htm)


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Private sector


That part of an economy in which goods and services are pro- duced by individuals and companies as opposed to the govern- ment, which controls the public sector (Dictionary.com 2010 http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/private%20sector)


Public sector


That part of the economy controlled by the government (Dic- tionary.com 2010 http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ public+sector)


Resilience


Ecological resilience can be defined in two ways. The first is a measure of the magnitude of disturbance that can be absorbed before the (eco)system changes its structure by changing the variables and processes that control behaviour. The second, a more traditional meaning, is as a measure of resistance to dis- turbance and the speed of return to the equilibrium state of an ecosystem. http://biodiversity-chm.eea.europa.eu/nyglos- sary_terms/E/ecological_or_ecosystem_resilience


Saphrogenic Formed by putrefaction, for example by bacteria http://diction- ary.reference.com/browse/saprogenic


Sanitation


A range of interventions designed to reduce health hazards in the environment and environmental receptivity to health risks, including management of excreta, sewage, drainage and solid waste, and environmental management interventions for dis- ease vector control. Adapted from: http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health / hygiene/sanhygpromotoc.pdf


Slums


Areas of older housing that are deteriorating in the sense of their being under-serviced, overcrowded and dilapidated (Unit-


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