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FEATURE Surveillance & Body Cams SUMMARY


Departments are looking at body cams, both for transparency and for when police actions are questioned. These cameras can ensure good behavior on the part of all parties and prevent officers from needless and some- times frivolous complaints from citizens.


This Poulsbo (Wash.) motorcycle officer can record his interactions with the public while on patrol.


SURVEILLANCE & BODY CAMS


DEFENSE AGAINST USE-OF-FORCE COMPLAINTS AND MUCH MORE


By Kathy Marks


cord the events that lead up to confrontations with sus- pects, rather than later being confronted by videos from the public that only show part of an incident or may have even been edited. It is very often the critical event that leads to the direct police-citizen contact that is the most important footage and without body cams, that impor- tant part of the interaction may be missing.


w 58 LAW and ORDER I April 2016 Some other issues might arise because just like everything else ith body cams, offi cers are able to re-


people see on television, the public and even juries will expect crystal-clear video at all times, showing every action, similar to the ‘CSI effect’ with physical evidence. The public and especially juries need to be made aware the video may not be that crystal-clear record expected. The lightning is often poor, subjects are moving targets, and depending on the angle the camera catches, the video may not show every action of every subject.


DOJ Funding In May 2015, the Department of Justice announced fund- ing for a $20 million Body-Worn Camera (BWC) Pilot Part- nership Program intended to allow local law enforcement


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