search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
T 1


Start Up Front


Perform your design and casting simulations up front, even though it adds time. Simulate the casting process as soon as possible, make it a priority and get as close to perfect as you can, given the time limitations of the customer.—David Weiss, Eck Industries


he days of mere conjecture, experimentation and hypotheti- cal theories have segued in to real world examples and experience for 3-D printing sand molds. No longer merely an emerging technol- ogy, 3-D printing has become a bona fi de tool in the manufacturer’s workshop. While research and development continues, the library


of successful production case studies grows, and industry experts have begun to learn a few best practices to share among peers. At the AFS Additive Manufacturing for Metalcasting


Conference in October, several of these experts dispense advice on what they have learned in designing cast com- ponents for this evolving technology. Here, Metal Casting Design & Purchasing shares 19 of those lessons.


reduces lead time, it also improves the design. Technologies that assist creating samples quickly will help maximize the evaluation time and decisions made during this critical phase.—Tom Prucha, MetalMorphisis


2 3


It only takes a few hours to print a mold but engineering and development time are the most important aspects of producing useable structural castings and that usually takes more than a few days.—Weiss


Design Nuts and Bolts


4 5


All the tools normally used to produce premium structural castings can be used with additive manufacturing techniques: chills, insulated sleeves, diff erent sand types.—Weiss


In additive manufacturing, casting orientation depends on the build-up direction (z-axis) vs. the parting plane in conventional sand casting.—Jiten Shah, PDA LLC


T e design phase is the most critical aspect of a component’s life. Many manu- facturing and performance issues created at this stage have a long term impact on product cost. An integrated approach us- ing computer based technology not only


This complex prototype crankcase produced via 3-D printed sand cut 10 weeks from the program and avoided $60,000 in pat- tern and fi xture cots. Printed core surfaces do not require any draft, so the part weight and wall thicknesses were maintained exactly as designed.


Nov/Dec 2016 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | 31


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com