This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
START CHOOSING WISELY


TMA’S CHOOSING WISELY RESOURCE CENTER, www.texmed.org/choosingwisely, has a host of materials for Texas physicians to start discussions with patients and avoid unnecessary care. The resources include:


• Links to evidence-based recommendations created by leading medical specialty societies. These lists help physi- cians engage in important conversations with patients to do the right thing at the right time.


• Videos featuring an overview of Choosing Wisely and more specific information for physicians and patients.


• Patient-friendly educational fact sheets and other resourc- es developed by Consumer Reports and participating specialty societies.


• Continuing medical education credit through TMA’s bundle of five on-demand webinars. For a limited time, the Choosing Wisely bundle is available free through the TMA Education Center. Earn 3.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and 3.75 ethics credits for watching all five webinars.


• A bibliography of Choosing Wisely articles from the medi- cal field.


tive is a chance for physicians to take the lead in promoting evidence-based quality initiatives, rather than having insurance companies or government agencies dictate those parameters. It’s also a way for patients to get


sound medical advice from a trusted source and for physicians to use these conversations to build the patient- physician relationship. In primary care, for example, Dr. Torres com- monly gets requests for magnetic res- onance imaging (MRI) scans, regard- less of their necessity. “Everybody wants an MRI, and I


have to explain that their history and physical do not indicate any of the worrisome signs we usually look for when deciding how to further evalu- ate their symptoms. I’m not a neurol- ogist or an orthopedist, so Choosing Wisely provides me a guide or mini- consult before referring them to a spe- cialist, and it gives me the scientific evidence to explain to the patient why we are taking certain actions,” she said.


“Our patients are trying to understand, and they are looking for this informa- tion somewhere. We [physicians] have to bring patients into our thinking, and we haven’t always done that. This gives patients a baseline for why we are doing or not doing something. But it’s the relationship and the time that we spend that makes the difference.” Some of those conversations may seemingly take extra time on the front end. But Lubbock emergency medi- cine physician Gerad Troutman, MD, says the recommendations are not only practical but also reinforce good medicine. As a board member of the Texas


chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), Dr. Troutman introduced ACEP’s Choos- ing Wisely recommendations to every emergency medicine residency pro- gram in the state and recently updated Texas members on the specialty soci- ety’s latest list. One of those recommendations


says to “avoid CT of the head in as- ymptomatic adult patients in the


54 TEXAS MEDICINE March 2015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68