This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Before David McClellan, MD, became an assistant professor with the fam- ily medicine residency program at Texas A&M Health Science Center, he was a family physician in Spearman, a small, rural town just north of Amarillo. With no specialists in the area, Dr. McClellan started performing flexible sigmoidosco- pies himself to screen his patients for colorectal cancer. “It made perfect sense to me,” he said. Now, using a grant from the Cancer


Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), Dr. McClellan and his col- leagues train family medicine residents at Texas A&M to perform colonoscopies — a similar, more thorough procedure — to examine and remove polyps from the large intestine.


T 22 TEXAS MEDICINE March 2015


exas voters approved a constitutional amendment in 2007 to create CPRIT. The state-funded organization awards grants for cancer-related research, cancer prevention programs, and cancer-related services by public and private Texas entities. Using funds from CPRIT, Dr. McClellan and the family residency


program teamed up with the Texas A&M School of Public Health to create the Texas Cancer Screening, Training, Education, and Preven-


tion (C-STEP) program. C-STEP provides free cancer screenings to residents of the Brazos Valley region who are uninsured or low-income qualifiers through the Texas A&M Physicians Family Medicine Center. “It was a really beautiful blending of two major parts of the Texas A&M


Health Center,” he said. In addition to providing training opportunities for resi- dents, Dr. McClellan says, the program serves patients who would not otherwise get screened for colorectal cancer. “The CPRIT funding has really been a boon to the people in the Brazos Valley


area,” he said. “We’re providing a needed service to patients, and we’re really doing something good for colon cancer prevention.” Since its creation, CPRIT has put an emphasis on funding cancer prevention


projects and recruiting top cancer researchers to Texas institutions, says Chief Executive Officer Wayne Roberts. But the organization suffered a setback in 2012, when a top official awarded an $11 million grant without going through the necessary channels. The state placed a moratorium on grants but later replenished the funds. Now,


CPRIT is bouncing back with renewed gusto, and Mr. Roberts says the organiza- tion is making rare and hard-to-treat cancers, including juvenile and adolescent cancers, a priority in 2015.


TRAINING RURAL DOCTORS, HELPING RURAL PATIENTS Mr. Roberts says CPRIT puts great importance on funding cancer prevention projects like C-STEP.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68