This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FIXING PAT


THE SENATE HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES and House Public Health committees made several recommendations to improve Texas’ prescription monitoring program (PMP), Prescription Access in Texas (PAT), as part of a larger strategy to fight prescription drug abuse in Texas.


• Transfer PAT and associated appropriations from the Department of Public Safety to the Texas State Board of Pharmacy (TSBP).


• Give TSBP authority to join the national PMP, InterConnect. • Make PAT more user-friendly by providing push notifica- tions, integration with electronic medical records, and other incentives for physicians and others to use the pro- gram without interference with patient care.


• Make prescribing information available in real time. • Automatically enroll prescribers in PAT when they renew their controlled substances registration (CSR) permit to encourage use.


• Align CSR renewal for advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants with their respective license re- newal processes, similar to that achieved for physicians in House Bill 1803 in 2013.


Read the full reports online: Senate Health and Human


Services Committee at tma.tips/15vI330, and House Public Health Committee at tma.tips/1y3eQ5Z.


Medicine’s requests for comment. But at hearings last year, agency officials told House and Senate committee members they continue to work on improvements to PAT, and the number of physicians, pharmacists, and other eligible health professionals using the database is approaching 100,000. DPS leaders and some lawmakers


also suggested that requiring physi- cians to query the database before prescribing could help cut down on illicit doctor-shopping before it leads to widespread criminal activity.


FINDING A BALANCE TMA President Austin King, MD says such a mandate would be “disastrous” for patient care. The head and neck surgeon from


Abilene doesn’t access the database often because he knows his patients,


“and most have an excellent reason why they are in severe pain,” he said.


“If someone comes to see me with ter- minal head and neck cancer, why in the world should I have to do that? All it does is interfere with the patient- physician relationship. Can you imag- ine an oncologist, every time someone walks in the office, having to check the database to prescribe pain medi- cation?” On the other hand, some of his colleagues, when on call in the emer- gency department, shy away from prescribing narcotics to patients who have legitimate needs when they do not have access to the patient’s medi- cal history. “If we had easy access to a data-


base, we wouldn’t have to do that,” Dr. King said. “What we need to do is move on to the next level of making


All articles in Texas Medicine that mention Texas Medical Association’s stance on state legislation are defined as “legislative advertising,” according to Texas Govt. Code Ann. §305.027. That law requires disclosure of the name and address of the person who contracts with the printer to publish the legislative advertising in Texas Medicine : Louis J. Goodman, PhD, Executive Vice President, TMA, 401 W. 15th St., Austin, TX 78701.


40 TEXAS MEDICINE March 2015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68