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SPECIAL REPORT ANAHEIM, CA SAN FRANCISCO, CA


VEXING PROBLEM From left: Homeless encampment made of tents and tarps lines the Santa Ana riverbed near Angel Stadium in Anaheim. City workers clear away obstructive debris from a tent city in San Francisco. Both cities have huge homeless populations.


the American Civil Liberties Union and denounced by homeless activists. After lengthy delays, the ACLU


suit was dismissed and the camp was cleaned up. “Trash trucks and contractors in hazmat gear have de- scended on the camp and so far re- moved 250 tons of trash, 1,100 pounds of human waste and 5,000 hypoder- mic needles,” noted a report from Spitzer’s office. Why are California’s liberal elites


so confident that voters won’t rise up and revolt against such outrages to common sense? One reason is their invincible


belief that the changing California population gives Democrats a per- manent majority. In 2015, “people of color” represented some 6 in 10 of the state’s residents, with Hispanics at 39 percent, Asians at 13 percent, and


A Taxing State of Affairs I


48 NEWSMAX | MAY 2018


African-Americans at 6 percent. Those changes have helped shift


the partisan balance in California. The latest voter registration figures show 44.6 percent of Californians reg- ister as Democrats. That gives them a comfortable lead over Republicans at 25.4 percent. But the GOP is now so weak that


later this year they’ll be overtaken by independents who are now just half a percentage point behind Republicans. “The problem is that when inde-


pendents do vote, their default option in California is increasingly Demo- cratic,” says Henry Olsen, the author of the book The Working Class Repub- lican: Ronald Reagan and the Return of Blue-Collar Conservatism. That helps explain why no Republican has won statewide office in the Golden State in more than a decade.


Perhaps that explains the attitude


of Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, who in February warned illegal im- migrants of a pending ICE raid in northern California. Her action may have led to hundreds of illegal immi- grants with violent and sex-related convictions evading capture and de- portation. Of the 232 illegal immigrants in


the San Francisco Bay Area who were captured, ICE reported 180 were either “convicted criminals, had been issued a final order of re- moval and failed to depart the Unit- ed States, or had been previously removed” from the country and had come back illegally. ICE director Tom Homan likened


Schaaf’s actions to those of a “gang lookout.” “You know the state is in trouble


n the 1950s, the state income tax provided only 20 percent of the state’s budget, sales taxes almost all the rest. Today, the ratio is reversed. That means that when recession hits California — as it did in 2001 and 2008 — tax revenue from high-income earners dries up, threatening local services.


when its own officials engage in ob- struction of justice,” former GOP State Sen. John Lewis told me, adding, “But I remain hopeful that when things get bad enough, there will be another vot- er revolt like there was with Proposi- tion 13 in the 1970s. But we just haven’t reached the bottom yet.”


ANAHEIM/ROBYN BECK/AFP/GETTY IMAGES / SAN FRANCISCO/AP IMAGES


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