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evade detection by using fraudulent identification,” the DHS said in a statement. So far, 28 states are issuing the


ON THE FLY A new, high-tech ID will be needed to fly on domestic flights soon.


Flyers Will Soon Need New IDs T


hirteen years after congress passed the “Real ID Act” to beef up


the nation’s anti-terrorism efforts, the Department of Homeland Security has set the date on which domestic air travelers must carry a technological- ly-advanced national identification to pass through airport security. It requires states to standardize


new licenses, and the other 22 have until this October to begin doing so. In order to get a Real ID-compliant license, residents must go to a Motor Vehicles office and present ID, such as a birth certificate or passport. But the sophisticated cards are


driver’s licenses across the nation into a single national identity card. Beginning Oct. 1, 2020, those new cards — boasting holistic images and digital photos — will be needed to fly federally-regulated commercial aircraft or to enter into federal facili- ties and nuclear power plants. “[This] should inhibit terrorists’ ability to


under fire from privacy advocates. “While it is ostensibly aimed at improving driver’s license security, its actual effect is to turn those same licenses into national ID cards by stipulating that state driver’s licenses and state ID cards will not be accept- ed for ‘federal purposes’ — including boarding an aircraft or entering a fed- eral facility — unless they meet all of the law’s numerous conditions,” the American Civil Liberties Union says. To compel compliance, the Trump administration has threatened to ban fliers who don’t get a Real ID. But those who don’t drive won’t be required to obtain one. Instead, a valid passport or green card will suffice when the new regulation takes effect.


U.S. Finally Cashes in on Worldwide Demand for Natural Gas


A


ccording to the u.s. energy information admin- istration, America’s natural gas production will aver-


age over 80 billion cubic feet per day this year — nearly 10 percent more than the previous U.S. production record established last year. Those soaring numbers could soon make the U.S. the No. 1 exporter of liquefied natural gas. Two factors, one global and one domestic, are driving


the boom. Globally, the surging demand for LNG — which is far more environmentally friendly than oil or coal — means corporate investments in new LNG facilities world- wide will be richly rewarded. LNG is natural gas converted to liquid form by supercooling it to -260 degrees F. Once liquefied, it takes up just 1/600th of the volume it occupies in its gaseous form. That conversion makes it ideal for shipping by cargo


vessel when pipelines aren’t available. Domestically, America’s utilization of fracking technol-


ogy to extract huge quantities of gas from shale deposits has positioned the United States to become the world leader in cheap natural gas exports. The U.S. export boom has already had wide-reaching geopolitical impacts. Allies in Europe and elsewhere who were vulnerable to having Russia cut off their energy sup- plies over political disagreements can now get all the gas they need from the United States. The Obama administration largely resisted the robust


export of LNG. By contrast, the Trump administration has been pursuing what it calls “energy dominance.” Five export licenses have been granted so far under President Trump, and 23 applications for permission to export LNG to non-NAFTA nations are pending. That’s good news for countries hoping to get out from underneath the geopolitical leverage some countries — like Iran and Russia — use over them.


MAY 2018 | NEWSMAX 27


PASSENGERS/NATALIE BEHRING/GETTY IMAGES


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