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Newsfront Spyless in Seattle


Russia’s shuttered consulate housed a nest of intelligence agents with a wealth of top-secret targets.


the Minuteman III ICBMs that are critical to America’s strategic nuclear deterrent.


5


Joint Base Lewis-McChord Air Force Base, Tacoma, Wash. The


central base of the C-17 Globemaster III — a key element in the U.S. military’s ability to mobilize at a moment’s notice — McChord is also headquarters to the 1st Special Forces Group that would defend U.S. intrests in the Korean Peninsula.


6


CLOSED A sign on the door of the Russian consulate ofice in Seattle, Wash., states that the ofice is closed and not accepting any new passport applications.


R BY ANDREW HENRY


ussian espionage from its Seattle consulate was far more extensive than has been generally reported,


sources now tell Newsmax. The extent of the spying, which


covered a vast 14-state region rang- ing from Hawaii to Iowa, included a treasure-trove of intelligence-rich targets like Boeing, Amazon, and our high-tech heartland in Silicon Valley. The consulate was closed by Presi-


dent Donald Trump in March after Russia allegedly used a nerve agent to poison one of its former intelligence agents and his daughter in Britain. The administration expelled 60


Russian diplomats and closed Rus- sia’s Seattle operation, where the FBI estimates more than a third of the staff were spies. Russia responded by closing the


U.S. Consulate in St. Petersburg and expelling 60 U.S. diplomats. The area includes many possibili- ties for Russians to target:


12 NEWSMAX | MAY 2018 1


Amazon.com, Seattle, Wash. Amazon relies on extremely


valuable software to recommend products of interest to its customers, and to automate the processes of ordering, payment, and delivery of items.


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Boeing Co., Seattle, Wash. Targets for Russian spies in


Seattle include Boeing’s new KC-46 aerial refueling aircraft and the Boeing P-8 Poseidon submarine hunter.


Creech Air Force Base, Indian Springs, Nev. Operators at


Creech guide the MQ 1 Predator drones that rain Maverick missiles down on jihadis in Afghanistan, Syria, and Iraq. It’s also home to the UAV Battlelab, which plays a key role in research and modification of drones to make them more effective.


4


Malmstrom Air Force Base, Great Falls, Mont. Malmstrom is 1 of 3 U.S. bases that operate


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Microsoft Corp., Redmond, Wash. Microsoft’s products are


so widely used, discovery of a single vulnerability could be a valuable asset for Russian hackers. University of Washington professor Don Hellmann told The Washington Post: “Microsoft is probably as much a [Russian] target as the naval base or Boeing.”


Naval Base Kitsap, Kitsap Peninsula, Wash. Kitsap is the


only U.S. dry dock large enough to refurbish U.S. aircraft carriers.


8 9


Qualcomm Inc., San Diego, Calif. Qualcomm, the pioneer


of the CDMA technology used in smartphones, creates specialized computer chips with enhanced functions.


Silicon Valley, San Francisco Bay Area, Calif. Last August,


Defense Secretary James Mattis proclaimed Silicon Valley’s advances have “got to be better integrated by the Department of Defense.” The Pentagon is already using Google’s TensorFlow artificial intelligence system to sift through the immense video data collected by U.S. drones. Silicon Valley is a hotbed of cutting- edge electronic research systems.


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The University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. Its research


ranges from cellular biotechnology to augmenting human mental abilities to advanced robotics.


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