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SPECIAL REPORT


California’s Crackup:


Can It Be Stopped?


C


alifornia liberals tend to respond to crit- ics of the state’s excesses with either fl ippant re- marks or fl ame-thrower


rhetoric. “From legal weed to spectacular


natural landscapes to ridiculously good burritos, California can seem like a paradise,” is how the San Francisco Chronicle’s Filipa Ioannou dismissed naysayers last year. Gov. Jerry Brown chose to play the


Nazi card instead. In March, after U.S. Attorney Gen-


eral Jeff Sessions sued California for its refusal to cooperate with enforc- ing federal immigration policy, Brown lashed out: “We don’t need a Gestapo- kind of tactic with vitriol spewing out of Jeff Sessions’ mouth.” Liberals are particularly touchy


SIGN OF FRUSTRATION Pranksters placed fake signs over of icial ones in California after the state became a sanctuary state last January. California’s new sanctuary status means local law-enforcement agencies are limited in how they can work with federal immigration authorities.


Political commentator John Fund says social engineering is leaving the Golden State permanently tarnished.


about criticism of California because they are using it as their social engi- neering project to build an alternative America. Narda Zacchino, the author of a lib-


eral apologia called California Come- back, says “the country’s most vibrant and important state has fi rmly estab- lished itself as a model for the nation — certainly not for the white separatist crowd that adulates Trump, but for the general populace.” No one doubts California’s im-


portance. If it were a separate nation it would have the sixth largest world economy — behind the United King- dom and ahead of France. Its technology, entertainment, and


scientifi c research sectors remain in- novative and magnets for the world’s talented technicians. But there is more than trouble in Paradise.


There’s clear and consistent rot,


and if California doesn’t address it, the tarnish on the Golden State threatens to become permanent. Even Zacchino admits to serious


problems. She writes: “California has the highest poverty rate in the nation at 20 percent, factoring in cost-of-liv- ing expenses, with another 20 percent ‘near poverty,’ according to the Public Policy Institute of California . . . the state’s overall median home price in August 2017 was $565,000, more than double the national average, and one- third of Californians say they spend most of their income on housing. This is not sustainable.” But urban policy expert Joel Kot-


kin, a self-described “Truman Demo- crat” who has long railed against the elitism of California liberals, disagrees in part. “You have a weird alliance against


aff ordable middle-class housing be- tween green-oriented high-fi nance types, crony developers and ‘not in my backyard’ young liberals,” he told me. “The state’s severe land-use controls have driven homeownership levels


MAY 2018 | NEWSMAX 45


PRANK SIGN/TWITTER


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