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PHOTO STORY - ABOVE: Rye’s Mermaid Street has just been named one of the prettiest streets in the UK. (image supplied and reproduced courtsey of 1066 Country Marketing/ Clive Sawyer.


Festival (August Bank Hol), Wild Boar Week (Oct), (local woods have one of the biggest populations of wild boar in the UK). “There is not in all England a town so blatantly picturesque as Tilling”. So said E.F. Benson, of his home town of Rye, East Sussex, used by the author as the setting for his popular Mapp and Lucia novels. During his time in Rye, Benson lived at Lamb House, former home of Henry James, and was, like Lucia, mayor of the town. Visit St Mary the Virgin church to view the stained glass window he donated, and spot Benson’s portrait and his dog incorporated into the picture. Throughout the centuries, Rye has inspired some of literature’s greatest names, such as Henry James,


www.countylifemagazines.co.uk


Rumer Godden and Ford Madox Ford. Take tea at Fletcher’s House, the former home of John Fletcher, the noted Jacobean playwright and contemporary of Shakespeare; stay at the award-winning guest house, Jeake’s House, where poet Conrad Aiken lived between 1923 and 1939; do your own thing at the Crow’s Nest, a stone’s throw from Church Square, where Mapp and Lucia lived. The town is perfect for a luxury break, overflowing with independent shops, antiques and vintage memorabilia, top quality accommodation and restaurants.


USEFUL WEBSITES TO VISIT www.efbensonsociety.org


www.mappandluciarye.uk www.visit1066country.com/explore-1066-country/rye County Life 51


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