This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EXECUTIVE REPORT


The FXM-30 has an integral suction pump.


Grasp new opportunities Probst has introduced some innovative additions to its range. Alan Guthrie reports.


The issues of safe manual handling and efficient lifting remain important areas of workplace Health & Safety. This is all the more so given that tradesmen often have to work with new materials or different techniques, and manufacturers are tasked with developing new solutions.


Probst’s Eagle mascot flew in for the day!


Probst Handling Equipment’s UK arm recently held an open day at its Telford offices to highlight a variety of new products that the manufacturer has added to its portfolio. Newcomers include a range of equipment specifically for handling larger tiles, under the Flieguan name. Sales & Marketing Manager, Neil Jones, told EHN that tiles made from stone, ceramics and other materials are becoming larger and heavier for certain applications and designs, and that lifting and positioning them can be a potentially more hazardous operation.


The Flieguan models provide less suction than existing Probst machines designed to handle much heavier objects such as paving stones, concrete slabs and kerbs, and are therefore lighter in weight themselves. They are designed to be attached to commonly used industrial vacuums and so enable hirers to target a new niche opportunity, as well as gaining additional revenue from existing fleet items.


The FXH-25 connects to a standard industrial vacuum cleaner.


Several Flieguan models have lifting


capacities of 25kg. These include the hand-held FXH-25 which has a suction plate weighing 1kg and connects to an appropriate vacuum cleaner via a feed hose and connecting cone. Installing tiles is easier as there is no need to grip on the side, especially for the last slab. The FXES-25 model has detachable wheels that facilitate the installation of a large number of floor tiles, and the wheels can also be reconfigured to lay the materials with a slight forward tilt when moved.


10


Also available is the MJ-J Microjumbo-Jet vacuum slab layer, which has a simple T-shaped lifting handle for installing smaller tiles. It can be fitted with a two-man carrying handle as well as a different suction plate to give a load limit of 50kg. Another Flieguan model, the FXM-30, is designed for use with larger tiles weighing up to 30kg. Its suction comes from an internal battery-powered vacuum pump and it can be fitted with counterbalance weights for efficient lifting and accurate positioning during installation.


For handling considerably larger and heavier tiles, the SH 3500 is a petrol powered suction attachment that can be slung from a forklift or mini excavator to handle loads of up to 3,500kg, such as very large slabs or street furniture. Also new is a battery-powered all-terrain pallet truck that has a maximum capacity of 1,200kg, and Probst is offering the Eazybarra multi-purpose compact barrow which has a ground level platform for moving slabs and other small building materials.


The Eazybarra is designed for moving small items on site.


Shown attached to a Kubota mini excavator supplied for the day by GAP (which has a depot next door to Probst’s Telford premises) was the HVZ hydraulic clamp which can be used to pick up and position a full square metre of blocks for quick installation. This is a lightweight version of an existing Probst attachment and has again been developed to meet demand.


• 01952 292733 www.probst-handling.co.uk


The HVZ clamp attachment facilitates large-scale block installation.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44