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BUILDINGS, MAINTENANCE & REFURBISHMENT


BUILDINGS,MAINTE NANCE & REFURBI SHMEN T Safe school crossings from THB T


HB is proud to present Safe Steps for Schools™; a visual road-safety programme which comprises creative and permanent road crossings and walkways to improve the safety of our children on our Our Safe Steps fo environmentally frie


ndly, skid-resistant and cost- r Schools™crossings use streets.


effective preformed markings to produce a striking, brightly coloured road crossing. This, combined with footprints guiding the children to and from the school, encourages schoolchildren and their parents to use the appropriate road crossing in a fun and visual way.


The crossing material comprises highly durable, skid-resistant and environmentally friendly preformed markings with a striking and colourful design that matches any specification, and any type of crossing. On preformed animal “


to and from the crossing, as a means of


crossing provided w encouraging the chi


school.


influencing their ch i importance of using that also aims to re-


Safe Steps for Schools™is a visual programme educate parents on the


ldren correctly on the subject a road-crossing and


of road safety. One recurring issue highlighted by primary schools across greater London (as part of a regional research campaign conducted by THB), was the poor example set to children by their adult chaperone when crossing the road. Common behaviours included parents leading their children in between parked cars, not using the crossing provided and in some cases waving


ldren to use the appropriate hen travelling to and from


THB


pawprints” and footsteps lead pavements, colourful


at cars to slow them down. Behaviours that all come with a risk attached.


THB’ Safe Steps for Schools™road-crossings comprise a long-lasting, non-toxic, cost-effective crossing that is environmentally friendly, using a preformed thermoplastic material. The application process involves administering a specialised primer and then laying premade thermoplastic pieces in place (like a jigsaw) on top of the road surface. The preformed material is then bonded to the surface through heat application. As a result, it is a cost-effective alternative to other solutions and provides a highly professional finish. The materials provide premium high UV-resistant colours with a lifespan ten times longer than traditional paints. This ensures colour is retained regardless of


weather conditions and frequency of use. This enables safety to remain as the highest priority, and is complemented by an anti-slip coating. The paints used in the materials are non-toxic and contain no hazardous lead or chromates to


preformed thermop ensure the safety of


complex designs to children. Furthermore, using


be created and is a material lastic enables intricate,


much easier to lay as opposed to other materials that require hand application. Using preformed thermoplastic as the crossing material is also less time-consuming, and therefore causes less disruption to traffic.


THB’s Safe Steps for Schools™programme launched in February 2018, with the first crossing installed in Croydon, to improve safety for the schoolchildren at Crescent Primary School. The programme will see THB engaged by a number of local authorities across the UK an d throughout 2018.


Contact THB to learnmore on our Safe Steps for Schools™road crossing


info@thbuk.co.uk 0800 0146 420


40 www.education-today.co.uk.co.uk www March 2018 2018


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