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VIEWS & OPINION Internet Safety


VIEWS & OPINION ty – behind the Green Paper Comment by MARK BENTLEY, London Grid for Learning


Comment by FAY GIBBIN, training manager at Busy Bees Training Academy


AY


The education world normally keeps its eyes peeled for key documents from the DfE but pays less heed to other government departments. But the new Internet Safety Strategy Green Paper from the Department for CultureMedia and Sport will have a big impact on the future of online safety, so is very much worth a look.


Currently in consultation phase, the new Internet Safety Strategy aims to look at how Britain can become ‘the safest place in the world to be online’. For time-short teachers the basic principles of the green paper are: ‘what is unacceptable offline, should be unacceptable online’; ‘all users should be empowered to manage online risks and stay safe’ and ‘technology companies have a responsibility to their users’.


Not much to argue with there, so you might be tempted to say “so what?”.While it is great news that the government is looking to boost internet safety the coming changes will impact on many areas of education practice, so have a look and make sure you have a say. Here are some of the key elements:


On the agenda On the agenda


The social media levy and code of practice for social media companies is on the way. There has been lots of discussion over whether the levy is a good thing or not. Some say of course it is; some ask if it might discourage organisations, such as Facebook and Instagram, from the considerable efforts they already make to prevent abuse.


In addition, the government will be looking closely at online gaming.We regularly hear about young children playing violent 18-ra (they aren’t more difficult – they are given that rating for 18-rated films) so this well worth looking at.


similar reasons as ted video games


Connected toys and the internet of things are to face scrutiny as well. To find out more about some of the risks and developments in this area, have a look at the blogs from John Carr, who keeps a close eye on these things.


The Positives The Positives


It’s great to see that the amazing work of organisations like the Internet Watch Foundation and other Safer Internet Centre partners has been recognised and mentioned in a key document like this.


The UK Council for Child Internet Safety will become the UK Council for Internet Safety (UK CIS), with a broader remit. LGfL currently sit on the UK Council for Child Internet Safety EducationWorking Group and look forward to seeing a more prominent role for this organisation. One job of UK CIS will be to “streamline and target education and advice on on parents” – that is great news and something that LGfL is with tools such as parentsafe.lgfl.net.


Look ng to the future Looking to the futurei


Looking further ahead, compulsory relationships education is coming for Primaries, and relationships and sex education for Secondaries. Other potentially controversial topics receive mentions too: revenge porn, fake news and age-verification of pornography are all topics we should expect to hear more about in the c It’s good to see a


mix of education, legislation and self oming months.


-regulation – some


you may like, others less so. Either way, be sure to make the most of an opportunity to have your say.


24 www.education-today.co.uk.co.uk www


Comment by FAY GIBBIN, trainingmanager at Busy Bees Training Academy


Let’s’s start treating apprentices as valuedworkers


Let’s start treating apprentices as valued workers


It is time to take to task training providers and employers who fail to pay apprentices at the statutory minimum wage, as a new study carried out by TUC has found that 135,000 apprentices in England are being paid less than the statutory rate.


A lot more can and should be done across the UK to celebrate the value that apprentices bring to businesses, and I believe paying each one a fair and sustainable wage is a good place to start. We are all aware of the value apprentic learners, but what some employers fail to


recognise is the value eships provide to


that learners bring to the business in return.When responsibly delivered, an apprenticeship programme allows learners to receive on the job training and advance their careers while earning a wage, forgoing hefty university fees and resulting debt. However, in return, apprentices often bring with them fresh new ideas, an eagerness to succeed and an extra pair of hands to support the existing workforce.


As the programme goes on and their knowledge and


It is time to take to task training providers and employers who fail to pay apprentices at the statutory minimum wage, as a new study carried out by TUC has found that 135,000 apprentices in England are being paid less than the statutory rate. A lot more can and should be done across the UK to celebrate the value that apprentices bring to businesses, and I believe paying each one a fair and sustainable wage is a good place to start. We are all aware of the value apprenticeships provide to learners, but what some employers fail to recognise is the value that learners bring to the business in return. When responsibly delivered, an apprenticeship programme allows learners to receive on the job training and advance their careers while earning a wage, forgoing hefty university fees and resulting debt. However, in return, apprentices often bring with them fresh new ideas, an eagerness to succeed and an extra pair of hands to support the existing workforce.


experience develop, the value they bring only increases, and so we would encourage employers to implement a progressive pay structure, similar to that available to a qualified workforce. As a training provider, we work closely with our sister company Busy Bees Childcare and other external organisations to offer our apprentices a payment structure.


As the programme goes on and their knowledge and experience develop, the value they bring only increases, and so we would encourage employers to implement a progressive pay structure, similar to that available to a qualified workforce. As a training provider, we work closely with our sister company Busy Bees Childcare and other external organisations to offer our apprentices a payment structure.


Within Busy Bees settings in particular, apprentices can find themselves working through three stages, each attracting a higher salary in recognition of their development. Each stage gives extra responsibility, preparing them to be confident and competent members of the team. They move up to the next stage when both the manager and training officer, in conjunction with the learner, feel they are ready for the step up.


also able to assist on line safety for


We would encourage all apprenticeship providers to implement a similar pay structure, not only to prepare their apprentices for a career beyond learning, but as a means of recognising the fantastic work these young people can, and do, deliver. We also welcome the announcement in the Chancellor’s November budget to increase the apprenticeship minimum wage by 5.7 per cent; this is the second rise in a and much needed. This government endo


rsement of the value of year, and it is timely


apprentices, coupled with the apprenticeship levy, will hopefully encourage large businesses to invest further in training their workforce in recognition of the value they bring.


We would encourage all apprenticeship providers to implement a similar pay structure, not only to prepare their apprentices for a career beyond learning, but as a means of recognising the fantastic work these young people can, and do, deliver. We also welcome the announcement in the Chancellor’s November budget to increase the apprenticeship minimum wage by 5.7 per cent; this is the second rise in a year, and it is timely and much needed. This government endorsement of the value of apprentices, coupled with the apprenticeship levy, will hopefully encourage large businesses to invest further in training their workforce in recognition of the value they bring. We acknowledge the effect the rise in apprenticeship minimum wage may have on businesses in terms of costing more to train new staff, but I believe the added benefits outweigh the cost. In return, you are much more likely to gain an eager, qualified new member of your team, who shares your values and work ethic thanks to the training he or she has received.


We acknowledge the effect the rise in apprenticeship minimum wage may have on businesses in terms of costing more to train new staff, but I believe the added benefits outweigh the cost. In return, you are much more likely to gain an eager, qualified new member of your team, who shares your values and work ethic thanks to the training he or she has received.


Within Busy Bees settings in particular, apprentices can find themselves working through three stages, each attracting a higher salary in recognition of their development. Each stage gives extra responsibility, preparing them to be confident and competent members of the team. They move up to the next stage when both the manager and training officer, in conjunction with the learner, feel they are ready for the step up.


December 2017 2017


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