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LOADiNG BAyS & DOORS


BrigHT fuTure aHeaD, says HarT Doors


Despite the global pandemic one of Britain’s oldest door manufacturers is optimistic about the future, writes Melanie rosby, Hart Doors’ marketing manager.


W


e have come an along way since the establishment of the Tyneside company in 1946 by the father of the


present chairman, Doug Hart and grandfather of the present managing director, Nick Hart. Focusing at the time primarily on


industrial and retail shutters, Hart has now become a very significant engineering business focused on developing a range of products including its high-speed door concept, Speedor, in the mid-1980s, making Hart the oldest British manufacturer of the high-speed door. The inspiration behind the Speedor high


speed door was out-dated doors in Hart’s Newcastle factory which “were bad for heating costs and the working environment”. The solution required radical thinking - high-speed, automatic doors where the opening/closing cycle was just a very few minutes. The result is an international brand. Speedor is now in use across the globe,


from North America, the Falklands, South America, Scandinavia, Russia, Africa, the Middle East and the Far East covering a limitless range of industrial and commercial sectors. Now that we have global carbon reduction


targets against the backdrop of the challenges of climate change, Speedors will play their part in reducing carbon emissions through their speed and greater automation. The fundamentals of industry will not change but with the high-speed door playing a vital part in an environment more than ever reliant on state-of-the-art technology, software, computing robotics and wider automation across every element of manufacturing and distribution, Speedors will have an important part to play. Global economies comprise hundreds of


industrial categories each with their own complex issues. One common dominator will be the need for advanced automatic door systems as designed and manufactured by Hart. Typical examples of Hart installations


include Nissan’s Sunderland plant where Hart installed ATEX-rated Speedor Cleanrooms to maintain strict air leakage limits and to ensure maximum protection for personnel in a potentially hazardous paint facility. At nearby Komatsu, the challenge was


safety and reliability in a highly efficient 200,000 m2


facility. Here each Speedor was


made-to-measure with devices and activators fitted to suit specific areas, giving Komatsu a safe and secure working environment for its employees. There can be no more frantic an


environment than at international airport where Hart has worked on over 40 across the globe. At Heathrow Hart designed, manufactured and installed 50 specialist and unique Speedor Conveyor automatic smoke screen systems capable of handling 6,000 bags per hour, while providing a seal for 30 minutes in the event of fire. For Veolia, Hart was faced with difficult


conditions on site including dust, dirt and moisture. Door failure could affect compliance with local authority regulations. The solution was to install 8m by 8m Speedor Storms, an extremely robust door capable of withstanding wind class 5 due to its unique guide system. Find out more about Hart Doors’ successes at www.hartdoors.com.


Hart Doors www.hartdoors.com Tel: 0191 214 0404


44 JUNE 2021 | FACTORy&HANDLiNGSOLUTiONS


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