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ANALYSIS: KITCHEN DESIGN Home Appliances


“Stoves Range Cookers are ‘engineered


for food’; the products are stylish, packed with high tech features and we have a selection of Deluxe models. Both brands have a rich heritage that is


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GDHA’s Belling, Stoves and Britannia brands all have very distinct personalities and offer different things to consumers, but as Sarah Whitfield, Product Manager for Range, explains, the thing they have in common is they offer a choice of both contemporary and traditional products. She says: “Belling is a family-friendly


brand with appliances that provide functionality and flexibility, whether you’ve got a large family to feed or you simply love to cook.


celebrated though their product designs. For Belling, the Farmhouse traditional style range cooker (right) is named after the original Belling Farmhouse of 1994 which was instrumental in the growth and development of the mass-market range cooker. For Stoves, the Richmond collection (left) continues to be one of the company’s best-sellers, with its chunky, solid doors and traditional handles. “Meanwhile, Britannia range cookers offer


high-end styling and design for those looking for high levels of quality, reliability, refinement and style,” Ms Whitfield continues “What’s important for us is that


regardless of the style the consumer likes, they don’t have to choose between traditional styling and high-tech features. Which is why we offer induction across both of our more traditional range cookers, touch control timers and even Zeus Bluetooth connectivity on some models.”


Says Gary Sharp, Group SDA Sales


Director at RKW: “We also launched our Bottega design which has a substantial cylinder shape; it was quite different to what was on the market at the time, plus the popular temperature dial feature. When we first showed the range it was the look many buyers had been waiting for! “You have to be careful not to stray into


nostalgia with retro design, but we got it just right.” The RKW team has also started looking


at contemporary designs too, as these and the retro ranges are both finding favour, Mr Sharp reports. The Cavaletto collection (left) – which features a retro-inspired pyramid style kettle – was launched initially in midnight blue and black with rose gold accents; that was followed with a light grey and marshmallow pink – “both of which have really tapped into a trend for lighter neutrals,” adds Mr Sharp. “Our venture into contemporary design


Distributing products from the likes of Morphy Richards, Tower, Breville, Russell Hobbs and Swan, RKW knows a thing or two about what makes SDAs popular in consumers’ homes. Focusing on the 100-year-old flagship


Tower brand, it has been pushing the boundaries of design to combine the brand’s


heritage with today’s kitchens and lifestyles. One of the first designs from Tower was


the Rose Gold Collection with accents on strong dark colours. This remains one of RWK’s best-selling collections, and rose gold can now be seen on many more products including air fryer ovens, irons, ironing boards and sensor bins!


is epitomised by Scandi,” he continues. “This features soft clean lines with wood accents and light colours – initially white or grey but most recently sage green and pink covering just kettles, toasters and filter coffee makers for the moment. Mr Sharp adds: “We are continuing to


offer collections that tap into design and colour trends, so watch this space!”


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