search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RETAILING


have little or no interest in doing any real gardening – whether that is due to a lack of time or skill. “Seeds do well but sundries are small for us,” says Ms Ferrando. “Our customers are not very green fingered here. It’s all about instant gardening. They will happily pay someone to get the job done for them but they are not interested in the process. It’s very different to what you would find outside of London,” she adds. This lack of gardening knowledge can work in the centre’s favour, however. “They don’t have the real gardening skills, so when something dies they come back to use and replace it, which is good for us, obviously.”


It also leads to great demand for artificial plants – but, as with everything in this area, only the best will do. “Over the years our artificial offer has become bigger and bigger. They are really high quality now – we purchase those abroad and they look amazing.” The Chelsea Gardener also has an


impressive houseplants department and this is another area that has


really grown for the business over recent years. “The area is as big as shrubs now” exclaims Ms Ferrando. Styled beautifully, like the rest of the centre, the department boasts an assortment of succulents, orchids, palms and mature cacti, amongst other tropical and sub-tropical species. A lot of the centre’s bigger plants and specimens are sourced in Italy, Ms Ferrando tells DIY Week, including large olive trees in the outdoor garden area. Like many garden centres, The Chelsea Gardener also recognises the benefit of having an on-site eatery to help provide a reason for customers to visit and enjoy its surroundings throughout the year. However, the business has found a low-maintenance, yet upmarket alternative to running its own café or restaurant by teaming up with neighbouring British brasserie, Bumpkin. The restaurant, which is located two doors down from The Chelsea Gardener and backs onto its land, has extended its dining space into the garden centre’s outdoor garden area, creating what it calls the Secret Garden.


The centre’s covered outdoor planteria is one of the areas available for hire outside of busines hours


Bumpkin specialises in British dishes, made with locally-sourced, seasonal ingredients but the partnership means The Chelsea Gardener’s customers are able to enjoy anything from coffee or a cocktail to a three-course dining experience. Bumpkin’s patrons are also able to wander from the main restaurant into the garden centre if


they want to browse the offer. It may not occupy the largest footprint amongst the UK’s garden retail operators but The Chelsea Gardener certainly knows how to use the space it has and offers more than enough to encourage a customer make a day of it – or even longer if they fancy hiring the venue for a private party after hours!


www.diyweek.net


27 OCTOBER 2017 DIY WEEK 11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32