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INDUSTRY INSIGHT


the hole in the first place,” explains Bryan. “We’re non-judgmental and don’t ask how you got into the hole. If you’re made redundant, we’re there to act as the safety net over and above what the Government can provide. If something goes wrong in your life and you work in our industries, we can help you fix it.


“The only crtieria is that you’ve got to have worked in our industry for a year. Because of our breadth, you’ve got to have been or be involved in the manufacture, wholesale, retail or distribution of products related to improving the home and garden. That can even be someone in a back-office function or working in customer service.” The Trust works with other charities to provide services outside of


its remit. “There are 167,000


charities in this country and we know where to look, so that’s how we can help,” says Bryan. “We’re a one-stop shop. We’re tapped into the industry, so if you have any problem – health- wise, mentally, or financially – we know where to go looking and can make a referral.”


“It’s about spreading the word. We know we make a difference. We’ve had people tell us ‘the RDT saved my life!’” Byran Clover


completey anonymous, completely confidential. We don’t judge. People make poor decisions in their lives and it’s not our place to say ‘you shouldn’t have done that’. Instead, we say ‘right, we’ll help you; let’s this sorted’. We will provide any immediate help that is needed and then look at the root cause of the problem and try and provide support with that.”


The easiest thing for businesses is


to make sure their HR department is aware of the Rainy Day Trust and the support it can provide employees, however, it can also help to have other people within the business informed and able to point out where to go. “If I’m in financial difficulty, or


www.diyweek.net


if my child has ADHD or is risking being excluded from school – the pressure on me is enormous,” says Bryan. “I’m not going to go to my line manager or the boss because I might feel my job is at risk but, if I know of someone who knows a charity, I might go to them and say ‘I don’t know what to do’ and they can point out the Trust’s number or give them one of our little info cards and say ‘ring the RDT, they’ll sort you out’. “It’s about spreading the word. We know we make a difference. We’ve had people tell us ‘the RDT saved my life!’. “The Trust exists to dig people out of any hole they happen to be in or to prevent them from falling into


Help can also be made available quickly if it is needed. “If my phone rings and somebody says ‘help it’s an emergency’, I can have a BACs payment out of the building within 30 minutes and in their bank in under two hours,” says Bryan. “We had a guy call up last Friday saying he had no money on his electric key, so I picked up the phone to Charis, they gave me a 10-digit code which I can then give to the individual to take to any of the relevant points and have £50 uploaded to their key immediately. And, we can do that within the hour.” As well as providing immediate financial support, the Trust also tries to treat the underlying problem and help people solve their problems themselves. “If you can’t afford to replace your fridge, we ask a simple question – ‘why can’t you afford to replace that fridge?’ It could be they’re not earning enough and they’re spending too much. “We replace white goods but also need to give them the skills to take responsibility and sort the problem out themselves. Our winter fuel poverty programme gives their boiler a service, put a corrosion inhibitor in, which helps reduce outgoings on utility bills by 10%, driving costs down. “Then we can look at increasing an applicant’s income with e-learning training modules, or funding courses, management training or whatever they need to increase their income.”


How can you help the Trust? • Site collection tins for the RDT at


HOW CAN THE RAINY DAY TRUST HELP YOU?


• Grants and financial support including:


– Ongoing annual awards of up to £100 a


month paid straight into your account – One-off grants for those crucial things in life,


like beds or washing machines – A fuel poverty package that, not only helps with bills, but makes your heating more efficient – Free debt advice


• Apprenticeship support • Legal advice • Free housing advice • Free telephone counselling • Training & Skills: E-Learning • A full welfare benefits check to see if you are missing out on benefits • Cancer referrals and the chance to tap into support from other national charities


your tills or within your business


• Help fundraise – for ideas visit the RDT website www.rainydaytrust. org.uk


• Get the right information out to your HR department and employees


• Volunteer – whether that is to do home visits, to spread the word, or to talk to people around your office


• Donate product to help the Trust raise money


• Register on www.easyfundraising. org.uk to support the charity whenever you shop online


• Sponsor or donate to the charity via www.justgiving.com/ fundraising/rainyyday100


The biggest obstacle, Bryan


explains is that people “look a gift horse in the mouth and always think there is a catch but there isn’t. We don’t expect you to write us a cheque – although that is always nice – but we are charity, we help people, that is what we do. “We also make all the material available; we’ve got posters you can put up in your canteen and staff areas, A4 leaflets, credit-card sized info cards – we have a whole information pack ready to go. All you need to do is give us the best contact for someone in HR or in your company and we can send them straight out.”


10 MAY 2019 DIY WEEK 11


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