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PRODUCTS SPRINGS & SHOCK ABSORBERS SPRINGS FOR EXTREME CONDITIONS AND SPACE-CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTS


Inconel, Nimonic, Hastelloy and Elgiloy alloys. Also available are the REDUX wave springs, which typically occupy just


30-50% of the compressed height space of conventional round wire springs, yet they offer more deflection with the same load specifications. This not only helps to save space but also reduces the production costs. Typical applications for these include connectors, pumps, clutches,


seals, medical equipment and valves, all of which require springs that offer uniform force distribution and/or uniform rotational pressure over 360˚ in restricted spaces. A wave spring’s design is similar to a compression spring, but the wire


used is coiled and flat – waves are added along the coils to give a spring effect. They are often used instead of round wire compression springs in space-critical environments that require tight load deflection. Typically, wave springs come in a wave top to wave top format


By using specialist materials, Lee Spring has the ability to address the issues of extreme conditions – not only low or high temperatures, but also those which are highly sensitive to magnetic, electrical or chemical conditions. As an example, the lightweight LeeP plastic spring range provides


non-magnetic, non-corrosive and chemically inert properties. Available ex-stock, this is often a complete solution for applications in medical device manufacturing, pharmaceutical equipment, aerospace and for lightweight products such as portable instrumentation. Custom springs made with super or exotic alloys offer enhanced


performance properties including excellent strength and durability, and resistance to oxidation and corrosion, plus deformation at high temperatures or under extreme pressure. These are therefore the best spring materials for demanding working conditions such as those facing extreme cold or heat. Examples are in the automotive, marine and aerospace sectors, as well as oil and gas extraction, thermal processing, petrochemical processing and power generation, jet turbine or nuclear applications. Commenting on this, Chris Petts, managing director, said: “Working in


a harsh environment in this case could mean anything from equipment required underwater, battling saltwater corrosion, to 35,000 feet up in the air contending with high wind speeds and low temperatures.” Lee Spring offers Nickel Cobalt, Nickel Titanium, Monel, Titanium,


MACHINED SPRINGS FOR CRITICAL AND HIGH DUTY ENVIRONMENTS


For those familiar with the traditional wound spring format, ABSSAC is offering a new way of looking at both spring performance and attachment. According to the company, as with its wire wound brother,


all types of spring type – such as compression, extension, torsion, lateral translation and lateral bending springs – are available in the machined format. However, from this point the similarities between wound and machined springs stop. Machined springs can provide very precise linear deflection rates because virtually all residual stresses are eliminated. As a result, there are no internal stresses to overcome before deflection occurs, which can be the case in the wire wound spring. In addition to this, the company can offer multiple start spring coil configurations. The machined spring from ABSSAC is suitable for use in critical or high duty cycle environments, and is machined to meet exact customer size and performance requirements.


ABSSAC www.abssac.co.uk


16 JULY/AUGUST 2019 | DESIGN SOLUTIONS SHOCK ABSORBERS FOR LIGHT-VEHICLE APPLICATIONS ARE FOCUS OF NEW CATALOGUE


A new catalogue has been released by Tenneco featuring the Monroe replacement shock absorbers and related products for light-vehicle applications. This is said to build on the company’s aftermarket ride control coverage advantage for the EMEA region, with more than 900 additional shock absorber references covering in excess of 60 million vehicles. The catalogue covers the brand’s expanded range of replacement shock absorbers.


The Monroe light-vehicle range, for example, includes premium OESpectrum shocks for customers who own late-model vehicles and/or value superior ride and handling characteristics; plus Monroe Original shocks, offering OE-style quality and performance. Also included are the Monroe Intelligent Suspension RideSense shock absorbers, which are designed for direct-fit replacement of original equipment shocks on vehicles featuring electronic suspensions. The new RideSense range, scheduled for mid-2019 launch, covers more than 15 million passenger vehicles. Tenneco has also introduced 40 additional shock


mounting (MK) and 60 new shock protection (PK) kits that together cover more than 70 million additional light vehicles. The catalogue, which is available in print and digital versions,


includes information regarding the role of shocks in ensuring satisfactory ride and handling characteristics as well as reasons for replacing worn units.


Tenneco www.monroecatalogue.eu


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manufactured from a single filament of Type 17-7 Stainless Steel flat wire formed in continuous precise coils with uniform diameters and waves. REDUX wave springs are offered in diameters from .236” (6.00mm) to 1.772” (45.00mm) to meet load requirements from 2lbs (0.9kg) to 90lbs (40.8kg). Wave springs are suitable for static and slightly dynamic load applications.


Lee Spring www.leespring.co.uk


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