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INDUSTRY COMMENT: BCIA


Jon Belfield, President of the Building Controls Industry (BCIA), explains what we can learn from the generaon of school and college leavers now entering our trade, and what we can give back to them to ensure the future of the building controls industry connues to thrive


he cycle of a career is fascinating and often quite random. There are three phases; somewhere near the beginning, somewhere near the end and somewhere in between. It’s not about where you are on the path but how you contribute to blending experience, learning, innovation and understanding of new and old technology that keeps us all relevant on that path and gets the best outcome for everyone. I’m focusing here on the second and third phases and the positive impact they can have on the first. (Many of you will have memories of that first phase as you were starting out and the people who helped you, gave their time and inspired you). Personally, I am probably further into the ‘somewhere near the end’ phase than I would like to be, but with the advances in technologies and the increasing reality that ‘anything is now technically possible’, the interaction between all the phases has never been more exciting as we blend experience with new technology and innovation. I can’t deny how much I would like to be back in phase one with the upcoming explosion in technology and the efficient way buildings will perform in the future. However, with access to those starting out and quickly having significant impacts on our industry, it constantly reminds me that whichever phase you are in, we all learn from each other, we have the ability to inspire each other and we need each other. Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, the famous American computer scientist, once said that the most dangerous phrase in the English language is "We've always done it this way”. She is a great example of using her experience in phases one


and two, to then go on and embrace new technology and new talent to develop programming codes that are still in use today (COBOL). It is not beyond the realms of possibility that this phrase, ‘We've always done it this way’, has been uttered countless times in work environments all over the world, perhaps as a way of showing a new recruit who’s ‘boss’, or just to save the ‘trouble’ of learning something different to what we’ve become accustomed to for years previously.


BSEE


It’s about give and take T


Safe hands


The built environment is on the cusp of something truly spectacular and the next generation of engineers have grown up surrounded by the smart technology that will help shape modern building design. The big challenge is to harness their talent and learn from the new techniques young engineers bring with them and enhance our own careers and skill sets. We need to embrace sharing knowledge, leadership and reassurances to help them hone their skills and go on to become the accomplished professionals our industry demands.


Will it be you?


The BCIA recently launched #OneSmallChange to raise and share the awareness and importance of small actions having big impacts. This was focused on any changes to reduce energy consumption, no matter how small, as when they are added together they have a significant impact – just imagine the impact on national energy consumption if every BCIA member could reduce the energy of the buildings they support by just another few per cent?


Coming into an industry like ours can be tough for any young engineer, but I am pleased to say there is clear evidence to indicate the future is in safe hands. For this year’s BCIA Awards an incredible 12 individuals have been named as finalists in The Young Engineer category, which I think is great cause for celebration. These young engineers know they are good, but they will still need guidance and encouragement from their seniors. The words you pass on to an apprentice or colleague could be the #OneSmallChange that helps steer their career in the right direction.


www.bcia.co.uk


#OneSmallChange can equally be applied to how we give time, knowledge and support to inspire the next generation of engineers to take on the wonderful challenges their careers will provide; ‘to get building performance and energy consumption under control’. We can all be part of their success – will it be you?


The TPZ-Net Wireless Sensor Range From Titan Products Ltd.


With a long battery life of up to 5 years and internal signal strengths of up to 60m, the TPZ-Net range of wireless sensors are the perfect solution when looking to monitor your environmental conditions wirelessly.


All sensors are linked to a network co-ordinator via our own bespoke PC commissioning software which is simple and intuitive to use, allowing you to easily set up your wireless network. The co-ordinator then exposes the data to a building management system via BACnet MS/TP or Modbus communications. Up to 30 sensors can be connected to one network co-ordinator and repeaters can be added to the wireless network to add mesh networking capabilities.


a


www.titanproducts.com


• Repeater


BACnet MS/TP or Modbus


Co-ordinator


BMS


Tel: +44 (0)161 406 6480 Read the latest at: www.bsee.co.uk


Titan Products Ltd. 15 Latham Close, Bredbury Park Ind. Estate, Stockport, Cheshire SK6 2SD Follow Titan Products on Twitter @titanproducts


Email: sales@titanproducts.com BUILDING SERVICES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER MAY 2019 27


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