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THE ISSUES Wealth SIR LLOYD DORFMAN CBE


Entrepreneur and philanthropist; founder of the Travelex group, now chairman of e-commerce platform Doddle and chairman of the Prince’s Trust


There are three things I always think of when it comes to wealth. Firstly, be prudent and careful with investments because it’s really hard to make money, particularly if you started from nothing. Secondly, absolutely put something back at whatever level you can. And thirdly, don’t be afraid to enjoy it – otherwise what was the point?


PROFESSOR CLAIR BROWN


Director of the Center for Work, Technology, and Society at the University of California, Berkeley and author of Buddhist Economics: An Enlightened Approach to the Dismal Science


As growing inequality of wealth has become a politico-economic crisis in the US, wealth viewed as only financial assets has clouded over other forms of wealth that are more important in creating meaningful lives for people and for ensuring a liveable planet. Buddhists and ecologists understand that people are interdependent with each other and with nature. The Common Good and individual wellbeing are interconnected with the health of the planet and of all people. For this reason, at the personal and national level, we want to share prosperity – both financial wealth and natural wealth. In addition to outer (material) wealth, inner (spiritual) wealth


reflects the compassion, generosity, and wisdom in our daily lifestyle. Consumption and wealth cannot satisfy us, as it leads to more craving and grasping without end. Caring for others, enjoying nature, appreciating life as it unfolds around us, and cultivating inner peace will bring lasting happiness. The ruthless, aggressive behaviour used to amass more and more wealth while plundering the earth and proscribing billions of people from living a decent life is immoral. For human happiness and planetary wellbeing, cultivating inner wealth rather than outer wealth will make everyone richer.


PHIL HALL


Founder and chairman of PR agency PHA, former editor of the News of World and of Hello!


Earned wealth deserves to be respected rather than resented. The British media seems to believe they have the right to attack anyone who is a HNW individual. That is wrong.


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