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15


Riddhi Oswal’s deubt pop track is inspired by her experiences of alleged bullying


Dragons’ Dom?


Having parted ways with the prime minister and left Number 10 under a cloud, ‘career psychopath’ Dominic Cummings has another psychopath in his sights: Donald Trump. Cummings reckons The Donald’s chances of winning the US presidential race in 2024 are ‘higher than most realise’. ‘Whether Trump wins or loses his candidacy [it] will be terrible for everybody,’ writes Cummings in his blog. ‘A tiny and cheap (<$2-3 million) project – independent-for-now of any candidate – should start now to figure out how a GOP candidate could win, how they could actually control the government after they win, and who the candidate should be.’ Even if the project fails and Trump


fees are $130,000 a year (covered in Spear’s 74), former pupil Riddhi Oswal has since launched an anti-bullying charity, StopTheB, and addressed a Unesco event on the subject. These, however, are small beer in comparison to her latest undertaking: the release of a her Anglo- French debut track, Top Guy, complete with dramatic pop video, all inspired by the experiences of the past few years. Oswal has also given herself a musical rebrand, announcing herself as ‘Ridi’. ‘The song talks about how even when someone is entirely innocent there can always be that one person – the “top guy” who has the power to essentially destroy everything about you,’ she says. ‘How someone can break you to the point that you don’t even recognise yourself. I hope my music truly helps people travel the same journey of self-realisation I went through.’


‘WE’RE JUST GETTING started.’ That’s the punchy message from Netwealth founder and CEO Charlotte Ransom


about her boutique’s progress after its first five years. So where will they be in 2025? The former Goldman partner forecasts assets under management for Netwealth of £5 billion, noting AuM rose 40 per cent last year alone. She wants the firm to become a ‘leading provider of wealth management in the UK’. ‘Wealth management is a long-term business,’ says Ransom, a supporter of greater transparency in fees charged by wealth managers. ‘It’s really hard for a newcomer to convince prospective clients of their proposition at the very earliest stages.’


gets through in 2024, Cummings asserts that ‘the predictive model of the electorate’ that it would build would be so valuable it ‘can hardly fail to repay the original investment’. Noting that he’s done such a ‘discrete project’ already in 2017-19, the Machiavellian’s Machiavellian adds: ‘The rate of return if you do something really cheap that affects hundreds of millions of people and trillions of dollars is greater than any VC bet.’


Flaxing your muscles


One of Hedgehog’s favourite bicycle companies, Hummingbird, has unveiled a new toy that’s perfect for the health- conscious, eco-friendly HNW in your life. The brand’s newest folding bike (pictured) is made of flax – otherwise known as linseed – grown in France and specially treated and lacquered in Oxfordshire by Prodrive, the firm’s manufacturing partner (which also works on F1 cars), to create a bike a light as the carbon fibre alternative but far greener to recycle and manufacture. Hummingbird claims the bike, which weighs in at 6.9kg, is the lightest folding bike in the world. Priced at £3,995, it’s also reassuringly expensive. What I can tell you is that it’s a thing of beauty and rides like a dream, making yours truly the fastest, greenest Hedgehog around. S


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