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UKRAINIAN FARMERS AND FUTURE


OPPORTUNITIES Ukraine has a strong agricultural heritage. According to The World Factbook, Ukraine used to produce more than a quarter of the agricultural output in the Soviet Union.


Even today, agriculture sector is a large contributor to the national GDP  the third quarter alone. This is an astonishingly large number and it goes to show how much potential this country has. The key component of this potential is, of course, the farmer. In this article I would like to focus on them and how Ukraine as a whole is adopting strategies from around 


After USSR broke apart, Ukraine was left with a weak economy and especially weak technological sectors. Because of this, the only route of development we could take was the one that we already knew quite well, in particular: production of grains, raising livestock, and metal exports. Thus, the trajectory of our specialisation was set, and just like any other developing country, export of raw materials with no added value became our main way of operating. Since Ukrainian independence in 1991 and up until about 2012, our farmers had only one possible mode of behaviour: sow seeds, hope that the weather is favourable, harvest the crops and  realistically the price would always be at a seasonal low when framers would sell it as there were very few consulting companies or anyone else that could help them understand how the price is formed in the market. Fortunately, over the past 7 years, the picture began to change. Growth in the market, introduction of internet in rural areas and increasing number of smartphones allowed our farmers to gain access to a vast amount of new information and opportunities.


SINCE UKRAINIAN


INDEPENDENCE IN 1991 AND UP UNTIL ABOUT 2012, OUR FARMERS HAD ONLY ONE POSSIBLE MODE OF BEHAVIOUR.


30 | ADMISI - The Ghost In The Machine | March/April 2019


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