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Future of Retail — Omnichannel


issue 07


airlines now offering the same seat at different prices when it includes some additional extras through ‘bundling’. For example, before the customer chooses


their seat they are given a number of options – in effect it is like ‘good, better, best’. These bundled options could include access to the private lounges and Fast Track check-in. At Ryanair there is Business Plus that allows


flights to be changed and includes priority boarding. Finn said: “This is hassle-free flying. There is


an element of stress around flying on cheaper fares and this removes that – especially for those flying for business reasons. This is a good form of secondary revenue for not a lot of effort by the airlines.” This thinking is being adopted elsewhere


with furniture retailer Loaf for example. Customers that buy a mattress will be offered


a bundle that includes all the bedding items. This is done automatically. Cinemas are also very good at getting people to buy things such as a large a fizzy drink when they arrive, which can almost cost more than the cinema ticket itself. The airlines are also using external cross-


sell (third-party) secondary revenue, which is huge and encompasses insurance, hotels, car hire, onward transportation, tours, attractions, restaurant bookings, and duty-free products at airports that could be travel exclusives. Such third-party secondary revenue


opportunities are also applicable to retailers. There is almost a limitless amount of tie-ins that can be done with third-parties to sell relevant non-core products. The beauty of this is that the third-party can largely be left with the task of selling the additional products and services.


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