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Seco a ve the cont incr


D


By Richard Piper, business development director at Webloyalty


espite the upheaval, there is a major opportunity that digital is presenting from which retailers are only just beginning to benefit.


We are talking about secondary revenue


– which boils down to non-core revenue streams. According to research commissioned by Webloyalty and the British Retail Consortium, 67% of UK retail businesses are driving at least a portion of their revenues from secondary sources. The more progressive 18% of players are deriving at least 20% of their turnover from this non-core source. Undoubtedly the most obvious and high-


profile beneficiaries of secondary revenue are the budget airlines.


HOW OTHER SECTORS DO IT Sinead Finn, director at Affinnity and former director at Ryanair, said: “It is a very important component of the airlines because as air fares continue to fall it becomes an increasingly vital source of revenue. At Ryanair it was 20- 25% of revenues. Every retailer should have an online strategy to expand their business and secondary revenue is an obvious way to branch out into other revenue streams.” The airlines drive secondary revenue


through two key routes. Firstly, there is the internal cross-sell (proprietary) aspect, which includes seat allocations and baggage check- in. This has broadened out of late with some


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